Bachelor of Arts Degree
in Social Change

Graceland’s foundation is built on educating students who understand they are a part of a global community. 

The social change major is a way to give students an education that cultivates and creates a transformative community beyond the walls of the university. Graceland’s community is shaped to provide students with the tangible skills and tools to go into communities to provide meaningful and sustainable change. And with half of the credits for the major available through the Equality & Peace track of Graceland’s essential education, students can easily double major in social change and an additional program, providing endless career opportunities in a more socially conscious world.

“Now more than ever, we know that big structural change is needed in every community connected to Graceland students. The social change major will have an impact in all fields of study, from pre-med to computer science to education.”
– Casey Main ’22

BA Degree - Social Change Major

The Social Change major at Graceland University prepares students to be difference makers in their communities. Through an innovative, interdisciplinary curriculum, students learn about the history and context of their chosen concentration and are empowered with the practical tools that will best equip them to drive change in their particular careers and advocacy efforts. This major is intentionally designed to be partially completed through the Essential Education Curriculum, making it very easy to add as a second, complimentary major.

In addition to the essential education requirements, majors in social change must complete 42 semester hours as prescribed below:

Core Requirements 18 s.h.

  • COMM2220 Communication and Advocacy3 s.h.
  • COMM3100 Intercultural Communication 3 s.h.
  • HIST3550 Contemporary US History or SOCI3130 Social Movements 3 s.h.
  • INTD4710 Social Change Capstone 3 s.h.
  • PHIL2440 Social Dimensions of Equality 3 s.h.
  • SOCI1300 Introduction to Sociology 3 s.h.

History and Context (Choose a concentration and take 15 hours from the list of options; at least 6 hours must be upper division; no more than two courses can be from the same discipline):

*A student may also build their own concentration in consultation with their social change advisor.

*Students may complete more than one concentration if they so choose.

Racial Justice

  • BIOL1400 Unity of Life 3 s.h.
  • COMM2500 Introduction to Mass Media 3 s.h.
  • COMM3900D Monsters in Popular Culture 3 s.h.
  • ENGL2330 Our Bondage and Our Freedom: Literatures of the Americas, 1491-1865 3 s.h.
  • ENGL2350 American Ethnic Literature 3 s.h.
  • ENGL2360 African American Literature 3 s.h.
  • ENGL2610 Whiteness and the Working Class 3 s.h.
  • ENGL3240 Poetry and Social Justice 3 s.h.
  • ENGL3480 Cultural Studies 3 s.h.
  • ENGL3560 Race, Space, and Place in American Cinema 3 s.h.
  • HIST1200 History of the African Diaspora 3 s.h.
  • HIST3240 Rights and Responsibilities of US 3 s.h.
  • PHIL2340 Finding Peace in Identity 3 s.h.
  • PSYC/SOCI3310 Social Psychology 3 s.h.
  • SPAN3240 Literature, Visual Culture, and Digital Media in the Hispanic Caribbean 3 s.h.
  • SOCI2300 Race and Ethnicity 3 s.h.
  • SOCI4330 Social Inequality 3 s.h.

Gender and LGBTQ+ Justice

Economic Justice

  • COMM2500 Introduction to Mass Media 3 s.h.
  • COMM3900D Monsters in Popular Culture 3 s.h.
  • ECON1300 Principles of Macroeconomics 3 s.h.
  • ECON1320 Principles of Microeconomics 3 s.h.
  • ECON3280 Economic Development 3 s.h.
  • ENGL2610 Whiteness and the Working Class 3 s.h.
  • ENGL3240 Poetry and Social Justice 3 s.h.
  • ENGL3480 Cultural Studies 3 s.h.
  • ENGL3560 Race, Space, and Place in American Cinema 3 s.h.
  • HIST3240 Rights and Responsibilities of US 3 s.h.
  • PSYC/SOCI3310 Social Psychology 3 s.h.
  • SOCI4330 Social Inequality 3 s.h.

Transnational Justice

  • AGRI1200 Sustainable International Agriculture 3 s.h.
  • COMM2500 Introduction to Mass Media 3 s.h.
  • COMM3900D Monsters in Popular Culture 3 s.h.
  • ECON1300 Principles of Macroeconomics 3 s.h.
  • ECON3360 Intermediate Macroeconomic Theory 3 s.h.
  • ECON3440 International Economics 3 s.h.
  • ENGL2370 World Literature 3 s.h.
  • ENGL3480 Cultural Studies 3 s.h.
  • GEOG/INTD/POLS1200 Introduction to International Studies 3 s.h.
  • HIST1310 History of World Civilizations I 3 s.h.
  • HIST1320 History of World Civilizations II 3 s.h.
  • HIST2200 Survey of Latin American History I 3 s.h.
  • HIST2210 Survey of Latin American History II 3 s.h.
  • HIST3200 Modern Mexico 3 s.h.
  • HIST3460 US Foreign Relations 3 s.h.
  • HIST3470 British Foreign Relations 3 s.h.
  • HIST3530 History of the Palestinian-Israeli Conflict 3 s.h.
  • PHIL2420 World Philosophy 3 s.h.
  • PSYC/SOCI3310 Social Psychology 3 s.h.
  • PSYC3370 Cross Cultural Psychology 3 s.h.
  • SOCI4330 Social Inequality 3 s.h.
  • SPAN3110 Hispanic Cinema 3 s.h.
  • SPAN3120 Hispanic Literature 3 s.h.
  • SPAN3220 Unheard Voices 3 s.h.
  • SPAN3240 Literature, Visual Culture, and Digital Media in the Hispanic Caribbean 3 s.h.

Tools of Change (9 hours from the following; at least 3 must be upper division; no more than two courses from the same discipline):

  • ARTS1680 Computer Graphics for Art Design 3 s.h.
  • ARTS1710 Introduction to Graphic Design 3 s.h.
  • ARTS2240 Art and Social Practice 3 s.h.
  • COMM3140 Campaigns and Theories of Persuasion 3 s.h.
  • COMM3210 Conflict Management and Dialogue 3 s.h.
  • COMM3500 Emerging and Social Media 3 s.h.
  • CSIT1060 Introduction to Web Programming 3 s.h.
  • ECON3200 Public Finance 3 s.h.
  • EDUC2120 Human Relations for Educators 3 s.h.
  • ENGL2410 Creative Writing: Poetry 3 s.h.
  • ENGL3530 Digital Filmmaking 3 s.h.
  • INTD4720 Social Change Internship 3 s.h.
  • MUSC2320 Global Musics as Languages of Peace 3 s.h.
  • PSYC3280 Psychology and Law 3 s.h.
  • RELG3540 Peace and Justice in the Christian Tradition 3 s.h.
  • THTR1200 Introduction to Theatre 3 s.h.

Recommended that Social Change students take Intro to Statistics and Math for the Liberal Arts to complete their Essential Education Math requirements.

Core Courses in Social Change

+COMM3100 Intercultural Communication 3 s.h.
An examination of concepts that have application to communication across cultural boundaries, with emphasis on relating them to effective intercultural communication skills. Goal 4, ELO4 Global Learning - World Citizenship, ELO4 Global Learning - Equality and Peace

+ HIST3550 Contemporary United States History 3 s.h.
The history of the United States since 1960 emphasizing social and cultural trends. Goal 1B

PHIL2440 Social Dimensions of Equality 3 s.h.
An examination of different conceptions of ethical social relationships and ethical behavior. Considers varying accounts of theories of value and right action with critical analysis of systemic and social influences on individual and collective interactions. Goal 3E, ELO3 Ethical Thinking and Action - Equality, ELO3 Ethical Thinking and Action - Equality and Peace

SOCI1300 Introduction to Sociology 3 s.h.
Introduction to the perspective of sociology, its basic concepts and principles and an overview of the field.Includes study of social classes, sex roles, crime and deviance, socialization, social movements and others. Goal 1C, ELO5 Social Science - Equality, ELO5 Social Science - Equality and Peace

SOCI3130 Social Movements 3 s.h.
Examines the origins, nature, and processes of social change movements. Prerequisite: SOCI1300 Introduction to Sociology or PEAC2200 Introduction to Peace Studies and sophomore standing.

History and Context Courses

AGRI1200 Sustainable International Agriculture 3 s.h.
Sustainable International Agriculture explores global issues, incremental and transformative steps toward sustainable agriculture, international development opportunities, current agricultural industries, educational pathways, and career options. Content includes emphasis on understanding the need for agricultural infrastructure and production, embracing sustainability, and appreciating broad-based, liberating (essential) education. ELO4 Global Learning - Sustainability

ARTS1680 Computer Graphics for Art & Design 3 s.h.
A technical course exploring the digital tools used in the graphic design industry. Students are exposed to the function, theory, and use of industry-standard computer hardware, software, and basic digital design principles utilized in the production of graphic design. Additional fee required. Goal 2A

ARTS1710 Introduction to Graphic Design 3 s.h.
Covers basic principles of typography, such as type anatomy, type fonts and families, communication with typography and an introduction to layout and grid structures. Typography as medium and message and conceptual solutions are emphasized. Additional fee required. Prerequisite: ARTS1680 Computer Graphics for Art & Design. Goal 2A

ARTS2240 Art and Social Practice 3 s.h.
Introduces an interdisciplinary approach to understand and produce social practice art projects with an emphasis on engaging community in social and public spaces. Focus is on being able to use creative acts as a force for social change. Goal 2A, ELO5 Arts - World Citizenship, ELO5 Arts - Equality and Peace

BIOL1400 Unity of Life (3-0) 3 s.h.
A study of the key characteristics of life that unite all living organisms, including humans. Emphasis will be placed on comparing how humans and other organisms fulfill basic life needs. Will not count for credit in the Biology major or minor. Goal 1A, ELO6 Science - Equality, ELO6 Science - Equality and Peace

+COMM2500 Introduction to Mass Media 3 s.h.
An examination of the various landmark theories, such as rhetorical, Marxist, and feminist to analyze popular culture, with an emphasis on the importance of communication in the production and consumption of culture. Students will study the development of culture by applying different theories or 'lenses' to cultural artifacts including music, movies, advertisements, clothing, etc.

+COMM3140 Campaigns and Theories of Persuasion 3 s.h.
An emphasis in learning theories, information processing theories, perception theories, components of persuasive appeals, and the ethics involved in persuasion. Further, students will examine the theories and persuasive appeals involved in communication campaigns and critique the success, or lack thereof, of multiple persuasive strategies.

+COMM3500 Emerging and Social Media 3 s.h.
An exploration of the emergence of new communication practices as well as their social, political, cultural, and economic impact in personal, community, cultural, social, institutional, and international life. Specific attention will be given to the ways social media influence and shape matters of ethics and privacy, how we see ourselves and others, how we interact formally and informally, and how we do business. ELO4 Global Learning - Innovation

+COMM3210 Conflict Management and Dialogue (Also SOCI/PEAC3210) 3 s.h.
An examination of conflict theories and approaches, negotiation process, conflict ethics, and third party mediation. In this class, students will become familiar with the causes of conflict as well as ways strategies and tactics used in conflict management. Further, this class will explore the foundational theoretical concepts and models of dialogue in the context of conflict management. Goal 3B

+COMM3600 Trends in Communication 1-3 s.h.
Advanced study in specific trends in communication, to be announced the semester before they are offered. May be repeated for credit as topics change.

COMM3900D Topics in Communication: Monsters in Popular Culture 3 s.h.
Monsters retain prominence across decades in popular culture. In this class, we will explore what the figure of the monster, be them zombies, werewolves, or vampires, can tell us about the cultural context and the cultural norms in which it emerges, particularly in regards to race, class, gender, ability, and sexuality. We will explore monsters literally as well as symbolically, as we work toward critical readings and strategies to engage popular culture.

CSIT1060 Introduction to Web Programming 3 s.h.
Basics of how the World Wide Web works and web site construction using HTML and CSS. Related technology skills will be covered.

ECON1300 Principles of Macroeconomics 3 s.h.
Analysis of the fundamental principles of the American economic system, centering on price, national income, international trade and finance, fiscal policy, monetary policy, money, and banking. Prerequisite: 1 year high school algebra; geometry recommended. Goal 1C, ELO5 Social Science - World Citizenship, ELO5 Social Science - Innovation

ECON1320 Principles of Microeconomics 3 s.h.
Analysis of the fundamental principles of the American economic system, centering on price, production, market structures, and a survey of contemporary economic problems, e.g. sustainability. Goal 1C, ELO5 Social Science - Sustainability

+ ECON3200 Public Finance 3 s.h.
An examination of the taxation policies and expenditure programs of the public sector. Related topics include public goods, income distribution, and public choice theory. Prerequisite: ECON1320. Goal 1C, ELO5 Social Science - Equality, ELO5 Social Science - Equality and Peace.  Offered odd years Spring.

ECON3280 Economic Development (also GEOG3280) 3 s.h.
A survey of various analytic approaches to the problem of economic development in Asia, Africa, and Latin America, and an examination of their significant policy problems. Goal 4, ELO5 Social Science - Innovation

ECON3360 Intermediate Macroeconomic Theory 3 s.h.
A study of national income determination theory and stabilization policies. Prerequisite: ECON1320. Goal 1C

+ ECON3440 International Economics 3 s.h.
Theories of international trade, foreign exchange markets, resource movements and international economic policies. Prerequisite: ECON1300. Goal 1C, ELO4 Global Learning - World Citizenship, ELO4 Global Learning - Equality and Peace

EDUC2120 Human Relations for Educators 3 s.h.
Development of awareness of various societal subgroups, recognizing and dealing with dehumanizing biases, and learning to relate effectively to various groups in order to foster respect for diversity. Emphasis on self-awareness in human relations issues and how this awareness can be translated into positive relationships. Introduction to pedagogical, curricular, and social considerations involved in educating various societal subgroups. Goal 3E, ELO3 Ethical Thinking and Action - Equality, ELO3 Ethical Thinking and Action - Equality and Peace

ENGL2330 Our Bondage and Our Freedom: Literatures of the Americas, 1491-1865 3 s.h.
Survey of writers from North and South America stretching from the advent of European colonization in the Western Hemisphere to the conclusion of the U.S. Civil War. The course will pay special attention to the legacies of colonialism and slavery, and the ways that literature and language, as oral storytelling and print culture, both underwrote systems of enslavement and created social movements for freedom and equality. Goal 2B, ELO5 Humanities - Equality, ELO5 Humanities - Equality and Peace

++ENGL2350 American Ethnic Literature 3 s.h.
A survey of multi-ethnic U.S. literature, including Latino/a literature, Asian American literature, Native American literature, and American Jewish literature. As a complement to literary texts, students will also examine a range of introductory theoretical texts in the interdisciplinary field of ethnic studies. Goal 2B, ELO5 Humanities - Equality, ELO5 Humanities - Equality and Peace

++ENGL2360 African American Literature 3 s.h.
A survey of African American literature from the eighteenth century to the present. An array of discursive modes, including songs, folklore, speeches, poetry, fiction and drama, will be analyzed across various African-American artistic and social movements, from sorrow songs, abolitionist tracts, and the Harlem Renaissance to civil rights speeches, the Black Arts avant-garde, and spoken word performance. As a complement to literary texts, students will also examine a range of introductory theoretical texts in the interdisciplinary field of African-American studies. Goal 2B, ELO5 Humanities - Equality, ELO5 Humanities - Equality and Peace

+ENGL2370 World Literature 3 s.h.
Examines literary works by authors from a broad range of artistic and cultural traditions, emphasizing literature in translation. Designed to offer students an introduction to literature as a point of access into global communities. Goal 2B, ELO5 Humanities - World Citizenship, ELO5 Humanities - Sustainability

+ ENGL2410 Creative Writing: Poetry 3 s.h.
Study of poetry writing through the lens of sustainability. Investigates the maintenance of various systems that meet human needs (e.g. emotional, physical, social, environmental) through extensive poetry writing and class discussion. Emphasis on poetry as a means of self-discovery as well as an art form. Goal 2B, ELO5 Humanities - Sustainability

++ENGL2600 Gender and Sexuality 3 s.h.
An exploration of issues of gender and sexuality in literature, with a focus on fiction, drama, and poetry by women and LGBT+ writers. As a complement to literary texts, students will also examine a range of introductory theoretical texts in the interdisciplinary field of gender and sexuality studies. Goal 2B, ELO5 Humanities - Equality, ELO5 Humanities - Equality and Peace

++ENGL2610 Whiteness and the Working Class 3 s.h.
An exploration of the racial category of whiteness and its historical relationship to social class and power in the United States. Representations of the white working class in literature, music, film, and television will be analyzed alongside cultural histories of multiracial, antiracist labor movements in the United States. As a complement to cultural texts, students will also examine a range of introductory theoretical texts in the multidisciplinary fields of Critical Whiteness Studies and working class studies. Goal 2B, ELO5 Humanities - Equality, ELO5 Humanities - Equality and Peace

+ENGL3240 Poetry and Social Justice 3 s.h.
An investigation of the role of poetry as a vehicle for social change. With a focus on the poetry of emancipatory social movements, this global survey course includes a range of modern poets who merged the personal with the political, including William Blake, Walt Whitman, Muriel Rukeyser, Pablo Neruda, Amiri Baraka, Adrienne Rich, June Jordan, Dennis Brutus, and Mahmoud Darwish. Students examine how poetry and poetic form function as a means of engaging ethical and social concerns, and eliciting emotions in readers-from rage and defiance to observation and understanding-that might serve to promote social justice. Goal 2B, ELO5 Humanities - Peace, ELO5 Humanities - Equality and Peace

+ ENGL3480 Cultural Studies 3 s.h.
Explores cultural systems of meaning and attendant issues of power, particularly in terms of class, gender, nation, race, nature, and sexuality. Emphasis on commercial and media culture. ELO5 Humanities - Equality, ELO5 Humanities - Equality and Peace

+ ENGL3530 Digital Filmmaking 3 s.h.
A hands-on introduction to digital film production and editing. Introduces the technical knowledge need to investigate the creative possibilities of composition, light, motion, color and sound in shooting digital film. Examines the fundamentals of nonlinear editing, including continuity development, logging clips, audio tracks, and transitions. Additional fee required. Prerequisites: ENGL2510 or instructor consent. Goal 2B

ENGL3560 Race, Space, and Place in American Cinema 3 s.h.
An investigation of intersecting representations of race, space, and place in postwar American Cinema and the different ways that films reproduce dominant cultural notions of “racialized space” that contribute to ongoing problems such as segregation, economic inequality, and police brutality. Emphasis on how films can challenge systems of spatialized racism and other forms of oppression and help in the struggles for racial and environmental justice. Additional emphasis on formal qualities of films, such as editing and cinematography, as ways to develop and enrich interpretations of what we see on screen. Goal 2B, ELO5 Humanities - Equality, ELO5 Humanities - Equality and Peace

GEOG1200 Introduction to International Studies  (also INTD/POLS1200) 3 s.h.
An overview of the major disciplines represented in the International Studies major. This course will also offer an introduction to contemporary global concerns through a study of current political, economic, and social issues. Discussion of important global issues will lead to a more critical analysis of news and an awareness of the responsibilities of national and international citizenship. Goal 4, ELO4 Global Learning - World Citizenship

HIST1200 History of the African Diaspora 3 s.h.
A history of the people of African descent in the Americas, including the United States, as well as the Caribbean, Central and South America. Issues of survival and resistance, the persistence of racism and white supremacy, and struggles for freedom, across countries and time periods, will be stressed. Goal 4, ELO5 Histories - Equality, ELO5 Histories - Equality and Peace

HIST1310 World Civilizations I 3 s.h.
An introductory survey of selected world civilizations from earliest times to approximately 1500 A.D., combining broad chronological coverage with intensive concentration on a small number of selected topics. Those social, political, economic and intellectual themes which have a direct bearing upon contemporary culture and society will be stressed. Goal 4, ELO5 Histories - World Citizenship, ELO5 Histories - Sustainability

HIST1320 World Civilizations II 3 s.h.
An introductory survey of selected world civilizations from the emergence of Western Europe as a center of world power. The impact of Western civilizations upon the development of other world civilizations and the contemporary emergence of a global perspective will be stressed. Goal 4, ELO5 Histories - World Citizenship, ELO5 Histories - Innovation

HIST2200 Survey of Latin American History I 3 s.h.
A history of the peoples of the Americas, from their arrival in the western hemisphere through the 19th century. Topics to be addressed include Native American societies and states, the encounter with Europe, the long colonial period, and struggles for political and economic independence. Goal 1B, ELO5 Histories - World Citizenship, ELO5 Histories - Equality and Peace

HIST2210 Survey of Latin American History II 3 s.h.
A history of the peoples of Mexico, Central America, the Caribbean, and South America, from the 19th century to the present. Topics to be addressed include struggles for political and economic independence, social movements, and the influence of North American and other outside powers. Goal 1B, ELO5 Histories - World Citizenship, ELO5 Histories - Equality and Peace

+ HIST3200 Modern Mexico 3 s.h.
A history of Mexico from the end of the Porfiriato through the 2000 presidential election. Emphasis will be placed on the Mexican Revolution and the rise and dominance of the Institutional Revolutionary Party (PRI).

+ HIST3240 Rights and Responsibilities in the United States (Also POLS3240) 3 s.h.
A study of the history of the creation and evolving interpretation of the U.S. Constitution, with emphasis on important issues decided by the Supreme Court. Goal 1B, ELO5 Histories - Equality, ELO5 Histories - Equality and Peace

+ HIST3460 United States Foreign Relations (Also POLS3460) 3 s.h.
A history of the interaction of the United States with the people and governments of foreign nations from 1898 to the present. Topics include US imperial ambitions, the world wars, the Cold War, and US concerns with foreign nationalist movements. Goal 1B, ELO5 Social Science - World Citizenship, ELO5 Social Science - Equality and Peace

+ HIST3470 British Foreign Relations (Also POLS3470) 3 s.h.
Survey of Britain’s relations with governments and peoples in Europe, Asia, Africa, and the Americas in the period 1815-1970. Topics include Britain’s role in shaping the post-Napoleonic order, development of imperial policy in the 19th century, Britain and the pre-World War I alliance system, the policy of appeasement, and the transition to a diminished world role after World War II. Goal 1B

HIST3530 History of the Palestinian-Israeli Conflict 3 s.h.
A history of one of the world's most intractable conflicts; examines the origins of this conflict; the concept of Zionism and the establishment of the State of Israel; the development of Palestinian nationalism; and outside forces-including Arab nationalism, colonialism and great power interests-that have had a major impact on the conflict. Goal 1B

HLTH3120 Human Sexuality 3 s.h.
Discussion of sexual biology, psychology, and sociocultural dimension of human sexual health and behavior.

MUSC2320 Global Musics as Languages of Peace 3 s.h.
Music, and sacred music in particular, has been the bridge to peace across many cultural situations and political barriers. It is a language (actually many languages) of connection between reason and emotion, personal and communal activity, solitude and social activism (all large political crowds sing and chant). This course will increase awareness of our distinctives as musical cultures, recognize the common themes and concerns of musical expression, experience great performances of essential repertoire, and make personal discoveries of global musics. Goal 2A, ELO5 Arts - Peace, ELO5 Arts - Equality and Peace

PHIL2420 World Philosophy 3 s.h.
A survey of philosophical worldviews with origins in differing traditions, appealing to historical and contemporary Western and non-Western philosophy. Addresses fundamental philosophical issues from a variety of perspectives and evaluates points of convergence and divergence. Goal 3E, ELO3 Ethical Thinking and Action - World Citizenship, ELO3 Ethical Thinking - Innovation

PHIL2340 Finding Peace in Identity 3 s.h.
A survey of personal identity, appealing to metaphysical and value theoretical issues as they relate to the self. Addresses the influence of memory, collective experience, and narrative on accounts of the nature of persons and assesses ethical implications of the accounts. Goal 3E, ELO3 Ethical Thinking and Action - Peace, ELO3 Ethical Thinking and Action - Equality and Peace

POLS1200 Introduction to International Studies (also INTD1200) 3 s.h.
An overview of the major disciplines represented in the International Studies major. This course will also offer an introduction to contemporary global concerns through a study of current political, economic, and social issues. Discussion of important global issues will lead to a more critical analysis of news and an awareness of the responsibilities of national and international citizenship. Goal 4, ELO4 Global Learning - World Citizenship, ELO4 Global Learning - Equality and Peace

+ PSYC3280 Psychology and Law 3 s.h.
An examination of the legal system - both criminal and civil - through the use of psychological concepts, methods, and research findings. Prerequisite: PSYC1300 or instructor consent. Goal 1C

PSYC3310 Social Psychology (Also SOCI3310) 3 s.h.
The study of how people think, feel, and behave in social situations. Attention given to research and application to social perception, interaction, and influence. Prerequisite: SOCI1300 or PSYC1300 (grade of C or better). Goal 1C

PSYC3370 Cross Cultural Psychology 3 s.h.
Study of psychological theories and empirical findings relating to variations in cultures. Goal 4, ELO4 Global Learning - World Citizenship, ELO4 Global Learning - Equality and Peace

RELG3540 Peace and Justice in the Christian Tradition 3 s.h.
Christian theology is a centuries-long conversation about the meaning of Jesus’ life and message. As theologians have interpreted their faith, they have often pondered questions of justice and peace. How can the nonviolent message of Jesus challenge cultures of oppression? Can war ever be ‘just’? What insights might theological traditions offer to help critique forces that perennialize poverty? What ethical resources can Christian traditions apply to environmental degradation or the search for gender justice? This course explores such questions by focusing them through the thought of key theologians from across the centuries: e.g., Augustine of Hippo, Julian of Norwich, Dietrich Bonhoeffer, Oscar Romero, Martin Luther King, Jr., and Letty Russell. We explore how these thinkers’ questions and proposals remain ethically meaningful in the contemporary World. Goal 2B, ELO3 Ethical Thinking and Action - Peace, ELO3 Ethical Thinking and Action - Equality and Peace

+ SOCI2320 Marriage and the Family 3 s.h.
Sociological study of the family institution. Topics include dating, marital roles and interaction patterns, socialization, divorce, and others. Goal 1C

SOCI2300 Race and Ethnicity in the United States 3 s.h.
Examines the basic sociological concepts and theories of race and ethnicity. Particular focus will be given to the social construction of race, as well as the causes and consequences of racism, immigration, education and residential segregation, environmental inequality, and social justice movements.

SOCI2440 Victimology 3 s.h.
Explores victimology, or the study of victimization. Topics include the history of victims’ rights, causes of victimization, its consequences, and how other institutions deal with crime victims. Also addresses how social scientists conduct research on victims of crimes and current issues and topics of interests to researchers who study victimization. Prerequisites: SOCI1300 or consent from instructor.

SOCI3200 Gender and Society 3 s.h.
Examines gender as a major organizing principle of contemporary social life and explores the different explanations of gender, gendered interactions, and its effects on identities and social institutions. Prerequisite: SOCI1300 Introduction to Sociology or PSYC1300 Introduction to Psychology and sophomore standing.

SOCI4330 Social Inequality 3 s.h.
Examines the intersection of race, ethnicity, class, gender, and other minority statuses and the relationships to personal identity and social structure. Helps to develop an awareness and understanding of diverse values, life-styles, beliefs, and attitudes of various racial, cultural, and ethnic minorities. Focuses on the social, legal, economic, and political aspects of prejudice and discrimination on socially disadvantaged groups. Prerequisite: SOCI1300 (with grade of C or better) and senior standing.

SPAN3110 Hispanic Cinema 3 s.h.
Designed to enhance students' knowledge of Hispanic culture through selected Spanish-speaking films. Prerequisite: SPAN2440. Goal 4, ELO4 Global Learning - Equality, ELO4 Global Learning - Equality and Peace

SPAN3120 Hispanic Literatures 3 s.h.
Designed to enhance students' knowledge of Hispanic culture through selected pieces of literature from different parts of the Spanish-speaking world. Prerequisite: SPAN2440. Goal 4, ELO4 Global Learning - Equality, ELO4 Global Learning - Equality and Peace

SPAN3220 Unheard Voices 3 s.h.
Explores representations of vulnerability in Latin American cultural production, particularly short narrative and film. Discusses the diversity of vulnerable experiences among unheard sectors of Latin American societies with a focus on women, afrolatinos, and the LGBTQ+ community. Taught in Spanish. Instructor approval required. Goal 4, ELO4 Global Learning – Equality, ELO4 Global Learning - Equality and Peace

Note: Since this course is taught in Spanish, an intermediate-high proficiency level in Spanish is recommended for non-minor students.

SPAN3240 Literature, Visual Culture, and Digital Media in the Hispanic Caribbean 3 s.h.
Explores contemporary literature, visual culture, and digital media in translation produced in the Hispanic Caribbean (Cuba, Puerto Rico, and the Dominican Republic). Through the examination of literary, digital, and visual materials, including narrative prose, paintings, murals, films, and performances, students will be exposed to multiple interpretations (new and traditional) of concepts such as citizenship and gender, sexual, and racial identities in the Hispanic Caribbean and its diasporas, particularly in the United States. Taught in English. Goal 4, ELO4 Global Learning – Equality, ELO4 Global Learning - Equality and Peace

THTR1200 Introduction to Theatre 3 s.h.
Designed to develop an appreciation and enjoyment of dramatic art and to foster an understanding of some of the basic principles which underlie theatre practice and theatre technique. Students should develop an appreciation for the work of the artists who help to bring the playwright’s pages to life as well as consider their contribution as members of an audience. The dramatic literature studied in the course will focus primarily on the issue of equality. Goal 2A, ELO5 Arts - Equality, ELO5 Arts - Equality and Peace

2021-22 DIRECT COSTS - Lamoni Campus

Expense Annual Cost Semester Cost
Tuition $31,250 $15,625
Room    3,770    1,885
Board    6,040    3,020
Activity Fee      370      185

University Technology Fee

     300


     150


Total Direct Costs $41,730 $20,865

Room cost is based on a two-person room.

For more information regarding additional fees, please see Lamoni Campus Tuition and Fees.

FINANCIAL AID

Graceland University works closely with you and your family to develop a plan that you're comfortable with. We develop customized financial plans for hundreds of students every year. For example,

  • Over 98 percent of Graceland students receive financial assistance, including International students.
  • Graceland awards are available for exceptional achievement in everything from academics to athletics and visual or performing arts.
  • We offer federal and state grants, loans and work-study for those who are eligible.
  • Our extensive financial aid packages will give you an excellent education at a practical price.

HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATES
To be considered for acceptance at Graceland University's Lamoni campus, you must qualify with two of the following three criteria:

March 23, 2020 - ACT/SAT Requirement:

Because of COVID-19's impact on testing sites, ACT/SAT test scores will be considered optional for fall 2020 undergraduate Admissions. Please contact your Admissions Counselor with any questions.

50%

Rank in upper 50 percent of your high school class.

2.50+

Have a 2.50 grade point average or above based on a 4.00 system.

21 - 1060

Have either a minimum composite ACT score of 21 or a minimum combined SAT I score of 1060.

For athletic eligibility, the test results must come from official test centers on the national testing dates.

A placement test will be required to determine proper placement in English and math if ACT or SAT scores are not submitted.

Applicants who do not meet the above criteria may be considered individually. If accepted, they may be required to take developmental courses.