Incoming Graceland students for Fall 2022 –

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Bachelor of Arts Degree, Bachelor of Science Degree, and Bachelor of Science in Nursing Degree*

*Students who choose to pursue the Bachelor of Arts Honors, Bachelor of Science Honors, or Bachelor of Science in Nursing Honors degree should plan to meet the specific requirements of the Honors Program in addition to all other graduation requirements.

Graceland University confers the degree of Bachelor of Arts, the degree of Bachelor of Science, and the degree of Bachelor of Science in Nursing. The type of degree granted is determined by the choice of major. These baccalaureate degrees are conferred on those students who satisfactorily complete the following requirements:

  1. 120 semester hours1
  2. 39 upper division semester hours (3000 and 4000 level courses)
  3. 2.00 grade point average on all work and 2.00 average in major(s)
  4. 30 of the last 60 semester hours taken immediately prior to graduation must be through Graceland University2
  5. A recognized major or equivalent
  6. Completion of the Transformational Leadership major which includes:
    1. Completion of the required General Education program or, for eligible transfer students, the alternative general education program, or general education waiver3.
    2. Completion of the Life and Leadership course sequence4.
    3. Completion of the Life-long Learning course sequence5.

Transformational Leadership Major

Since 1895, Graceland University has been developing students into people who will change the world by giving them the best experience and education possible. To accomplish this transformative experience, Graceland requires all incoming students to participate in the Transformational Leadership Major.

Unique to Graceland, the Transformational Leadership Major provides students with both the classroom and experiential learning that provides them with the knowledge and skills to change the world. Accompanying the knowledge that the student’s chosen expertise major provides, this major gives students a breadth of knowledge via the general education component, systematic development of their leadership skills in the Life & Leadership sequence and a start on the path of life-long learning through study in Health and Wholeness, Data Fluency & Citizenship, and Social Responsibility.

Scaffolded throughout this curriculum are the foundational learning outcomes of higher order thinking, character, social responsibility, holistic well-being, and digital citizenship.

  • General Education Program

    General Education Program

    The General Education Program requires completion of the following.

    Foundational Skills – courses in writing and communication skills (9 s.h.)

    • ENGL1100 Composition I: Introduction to Writing Skills or HONR1010 Honors 101
    • COMM1100 Foundations of Public Speaking or HONR2010 Honors 201
    • ENGL2110 Compostion II: Research Writing and Argumentation

    Foundational Skills – courses in mathematics/quantitative skills (6 s.h.)

    Statistics Course (3 s.h.)

    Mathematics Courses (3 s.h.)

    Liberal Learning – courses in arts, histories, humanities, natural sciences, and social Sciences (16 s.h.)

    Arts (3 s.h.)

    • ARTS2330 Art History: Innovation and Politics
    • ARTS3110 Art History: Activism, Empathy, and Justice
    • MUSC3340 Musical Citizenship: Artistic Activism and Social Justice
    • MUSC3350 From Louis Armstrong to Lady Gaga: A History of American Popular Music
    • THTR1230 Theatre and Society

    Histories (3 s.h.)

    Humanities (3 s.h.)

    Natural Sciences (4 s.h. which requires a laboratory experience)

    Social Sciences (3 s.h.)

    Courses Offered
    • ARTS2330Art History: Innovation and Politics
      ARTS2330 Art History: Innovation and Politics - 3 s.h.

      Theme-based art history course exploring topics such as innovation, power, politics, architecture, entertainment, sacred spaces, sustainability, and eco art throughout art history to the present. ELO5 Arts - Innovation, GE3A Liberal Learning-Arts.

    • ARTS3110Art History: Activism, Empathy and Justice
      ARTS3110 Art History: Activism, Empathy and Justice - 3 s.h.

      Theme-based art history course that explores topics such as activism, empathy, justice, disability, mental illness, feminism, sexuality, queer art, social and civic engagement, labor, and race throughout art history to the present. ELO5 Arts - Equality, ELO5 Arts - Equality and Peace, GE3A Liberal Learning-Arts.

    • BIOL1200Environmental Science with Lab (also CHEM1200)
      BIOL1200 Environmental Science with Lab (also CHEM1200) - 4 s.h.

      An exploration of the biotic and abiotic components of the environment, including the biological, physical, and chemical processes that shape natural ecosystems (e.g., biogeochemical cycles). The course will also examine the impact of human population growth, resource use, emissions production, and technological innovations on the environment. Current environmental issues, such as loss of biodiversity, ecosystem degradation, air and water pollution, and climate change, will be considered. Additional fee required. ELO6 Science - Innovation, GE3D Liberal Learning-Natural Sciences

    • BIOL2580Drug Development and Society with Lab
      BIOL2580 Drug Development and Society with Lab - 4 s.h.

      This course will offer students the experience of critically reviewing scientific questions using scientific method that applies to the discovery and development of medicines. The course will explore science of drug discovery, development, and federal regulation of drugs. Additional fee required. ELO6 Science - Innovation, GE3D Liberal Learning-Natural Sciences.

    • CHEM1200Environmental Science with Lab (also BIOL1200)
      CHEM1200 Environmental Science with Lab (also BIOL1200) - 4 s.h.

      An exploration of the biotic and abiotic components of the environment, including the biological, physical, and chemical processes that shape natural ecosystems (e.g., biogeochemical cycles). The course will also examine the impact of human population growth, resource use, emissions production, and technological innovations on the environment. Current environmental issues, such as loss of biodiversity, ecosystem degradation, air and water pollution, and climate change, will be considered. Additional fee required. ELO6 Science - Innovation, GE3D Liberal Learning-Natural Sciences.

    • CHEM1330Introduction to General, Organic, and Biochemistry with Lab
      CHEM1330 Introduction to General, Organic, and Biochemistry with Lab - 4 s.h.

      An introduction to the principles of inorganic, organic and biochemistry, including a study of atoms, chemical bonding, types of chemical reactions (focusing on ones in the cell), solution chemistry, introduction of biological molecules (proteins, lipids, carbohydrates, and nucleic acids). This course is intended for students desiring a general education in chemistry, those majoring in nursing or allied health fields and those that need it to fulfill the chemistry requirement for cell biology and genetics course. Prerequisite: MATH1280 or one year of high school algebra (C or better strongly recommended). Additional fees required. GE3D Liberal Learning-Natural Sciences

    • CHEM1340Forensic Chemistry with Lab
      CHEM1340 Forensic Chemistry with Lab - 4 s.h.

      This course will expose students to the field of forensic science primarily using chemical forensics and testing. Topics include evidence collection and preservation, drugs and drug chemistry, heat and explosions, poisons and others. The course will cover basic chemical concepts needed to plan, execute, and interpret forensic results. All necessary scientific concepts will be developed in the context of forensic science. Additional fee required. ELO6 Science - World Citizenship, ELO6 Science - Innovation, GE3D Liberal Learning-Natural Sciences

    • CHEM1410General Chemistry I Workshop with Lab
      CHEM1410 General Chemistry I Workshop with Lab - 4 s.h.

      General Chemistry I Workshop is appropriate for any student interested in developing a strong background in chemistry. It is intended to be the first university chemistry course for science majors. As such, it will be fairly rigorous and will draw upon previous experience in mathematics and science. Major areas to be covered include atomic and molecular structures, chemical bonding, stoichiometric relationships, and chemical reactions. Laboratory activities and experiments are closely related to concepts introduced in class discussions and will allow students to develop their laboratory skills. Good safety practices and experimental record keeping will be stressed. Students are expected to actively participate in class activities and discussions in addition to homework assignments, individual/group study and preparation for exams. Course is intended for biology, chemistry, and some allied health majors. Additional fee required. Fulfills liberal learning science course. Prerequisites: MATH1280 and CHEM1310 or one year of high school chemistry. EL06 Science, GE3D Liberal Learning-Natural Sciences.

    • COMM1100Foundations of Public Speaking
      COMM1100 Foundations of Public Speaking - 3 s.h.

      Foundations of Public Speaking focuses on practices in the speech processes of writing, delivery, listening, audience analysis, criticism, and performance of introductory, informative, persuasive, and mediated speeches. The course introduces foundations of academic research and provides students with the skillset to expand their critical thinking and speaking to meet the dynamic demands of public communication. The emphasis of the course is on learning through performance and application of communication principles and tools. In order for students to complete the foundation skills sequence, they must earn a grade of C or higher in this class. Prerequisite C or better in ENGL1100. ELO1B Communications, GE1B Foundational Skills-Writing and Communication.

    • COMM1250Introduction to Communication Theory
      COMM1250 Introduction to Communication Theory - 3 s.h.

      Survey of the major theories that support research and study of communication, such as interpersonal communication, organizational communication, rhetoric, media, culture, and ethics. The course gives students a foundation in communication vocabulary, basic knowledge of key theories, and an introduction to practical application of theory to human communication. Offered every Fall. ELO5 Humanities - Innovation, GE3C Liberal Learning-Humanities.

    • COMM2110Intercultural Communication
      COMM2110 Intercultural Communication - 3 s.h.

      An examination of concepts that have application to communication across cultural boundaries, with emphasis on relating them to effective intercultural communication skGE3C Liberal Learning-Humanities. ELO4 Global Learning - World Citizenship, ELO4 Global Learning - Equality and Peace, GE3C Liberal Learning-Humanities. +This course is only offered every other year.

    • COMM2300Introduction to Media Technologies
      COMM2300 Introduction to Media Technologies - 3 s.h.

      Introduction to the primary mass media forms - newspapers, books, magazines, radio, television, sound recording, movies, and the Internet - to gain an understanding of the ways they operate. Included are industries based on mass media, journalism, advertising, and public relations?as well mass media theory, law, and ethics. Emphasis on critical thinking about the mass media. +This course is only offered every other year.

    • COMM2500Introduction to Mass Media
      COMM2500 Introduction to Mass Media - 3 s.h.

      An examination of the various landmark theories, such as rhetorical, Marxist, and feminist to analyze popular culture, with an emphasis on the importance of communication in the production and consumption of culture. Students will study the development of culture by applying different theories or 'lenses' to cultural artifacts including music, movies, advertisements, clothing, etc. GE3C Liberal Learning-Humanities +This course is only offered every other year.

    • ECON1300Principles of Macroeconomics
      ECON1300 Principles of Macroeconomics - 3 s.h.

      Analysis of the fundamental principles of the American economic system, centering on price, national income, international trade and finance, fiscal policy, monetary policy, money, and banking. Prerequisite: 1 year high school algebra; geometry recommended. Goal 1C, ELO5 Social Science - World Citizenship, ELO5 Social Science - Innovation

    • ECON1320Principles of Microeconomics
      ECON1320 Principles of Microeconomics - 3 s.h.

      Analysis of the fundamental principles of the American economic system, centering on price, production, market structures, and a survey of contemporary economic problems, e.g. sustainability. Goal 1C, ELO5 Social Science - Sustainability

    • EDUC2120Human Relations
      EDUC2120 Human Relations - 3 s.h.

      Analysis of various societal subgroups and how such groups recognize and deal with dehumanizing biases. Students learn to relate effectively to various groups to foster understanding and respect for equity, diversity, and inclusion. Emphasis on self-awareness in human relations issues and how this awareness can be translated into positive relationships. Introduction to ethnographic analysis and pedagogical, curricular, and social considerations involved in working with and educating various societal subgroups. ELO3 Ethical Thinking and Action - Equality, ELO3 Ethical Thinking and Action - Equality and Peace, GE3E Liberal Learning-Social Sciences

    • ENGL1100Composition I: Introduction to Writing
      ENGL1100 Composition I: Introduction to Writing - 3 s.h.

      This is a writing-intensive course preparing students to become stronger, more confident writers as they develop their writing process habits and their ability to think critically about arguments around them. Students can expect to produce, deliver, and analyze college-level, written texts in addition to learning about grammar-use in context with an emphasis on meaning within the editing process. In order for students to complete the foundation skills sequence, they must earn a grade of C or higher in this class. In order to move on to COMM1100, students must earn the grade of a "C" or higher. Corequisite for students with ACT English score of 15 and below, or an SAT English score of 480 and below: ENGL1110 unless they have taken two high school English courses, one of which must be or prominently require composition (not creative writing), with a grade of "C" or better in both. ELO1A Communication, GE1A Foundational Skills-Writing and Communication. Corequisite for students with ACT English score of 15 and below, or an SAT English score of 480 and below: ENGL1110 unless they have taken two high school English courses, one of which must be or prominently require composition (not creative writing), with a grade of "C" or better in both. ELO1A Communication, GE1A Foundational Skills-Writing and Communication

    • ENGL2110Composition II: Research Writing and Argumentation
      ENGL2110 Composition II: Research Writing and Argumentation - 3 s.h.

      This is a writing-intensive course that is meant to develop students’ academic research processes. Students should expect to engage in work that is framed for “public” audiences outside of the classroom and to practice collaboration in research and writing processes. As the final course of the foundational communication skills sequence, students will be encouraged to use research processes to gain an awareness of topics and conversations happening in the larger social world. In order for students to complete the foundational skills sequence, they must earn a grade of C or higher in this class. Prerequisite C or better in ENGL1100 and COMM1100. ELO1B Communication, GE1C Foundational Skills-Writing and Communication.

    • ENGL2370World Literature
      ENGL2370 World Literature - 3 s.h.

      Examines literary works by authors from a broad range of artistic and cultural traditions, emphasizing literature in translation. Designed to offer students an introduction to literature as a point of access into global communities. Goal 2B, ELO5 Humanities - World Citizenship, ELO5 Humanities - Sustainability, GE3C Liberal Learning-Humanities. +This course is only offered every other year.

    • ENGL2903Topics in Literature
      ENGL2903 Topics in Literature - 3 s.h.

      Special studies in Literature designed primarily for the non-English major. Content may vary and will be announced at time of offering. When content changes, course may be repeated for credit. GE3C Liberal Learning-Humanities

    • ENGL3480Cultural Studies
      ENGL3480 Cultural Studies - 3 s.h.

      Explores cultural systems of meaning and attendant issues of power, particularly in terms of class, gender, nation, race, nature, and sexuality. Emphasis on commercial and media culture. ELO5 Humanities - Equality, ELO5 Humanities - Equality and Peace. +This course is only offered every other year.

    • HIST1200History of the African Diaspora
      HIST1200 History of the African Diaspora - 3 s.h.

      A history of the people of African descent in the Americas, including the United States, as well as the Caribbean, Central and South America. Issues of survival and resistance, the persistence of racism and white supremacy, and struggles for freedom, across countries and time periods, will be stressed. Goal 4, ELO5 Histories - Equality, ELO5 Histories - Equality and Peace, GE3B Liberal Learning-Histories.

    • HIST1320World Civilizations II
      HIST1320 World Civilizations II - 3 s.h.

      An introductory survey of selected world civilizations from the emergence of Western Europe as a center of world power. The impact of Western civilizations upon the development of other world civilizations and the contemporary emergence of a global perspective will be stressed. Goal 4, ELO5 Histories - World Citizenship, ELO5 Histories - Innovation, GE3B Liberal Learning-Histories.

    • HIST2420United States History Since 1877
      HIST2420 United States History Since 1877 - 3 s.h.

      A survey of the personalities, events, and ideas that have shaped United States history since the Civil War and Reconstruction. Emphasis upon the rise of the industrial United States, 20th century adjustments to prosperity, depression and world war, and the political, social, and economic changes since World War II. Goal 1B, ELO5 Histories - Innovation, GE3B Liberal Learning-Histories.

    • HONR1010Honors 101
      HONR1010 Honors 101 - 3 s.h.

      Interdisciplinary first-year seminar provides a common intellectual experience for new Honors students and introduces them to the culture and opportunities of a small liberal arts institution. Designed to help exceptional students produce, deliver, and, analyze written and oral texts and learn how written and oral performances function together in specific discourse communities. Substitutes for Discourse I. Admission by selection only. ELO1A Communication, GE1B Foundational Skills-Writing and Communication.

    • HONR2010Honors 201
      HONR2010 Honors 201 - 3 s.h.

      The second of two sequenced interdisciplinary Honors seminars focused on developing the skills of written and oral communication, critical inquiry, and research. Students produce, deliver, and analyze college-level written and oral texts based on sustained academic research, and continue to develop their understanding of critical discourse analysis and critical language awareness in the context of a range of discursive forms (written, oral, visual and/or multimedia). Reinforces the common intellectual experience of the Honors program and further exposes students to the culture and opportunities of a small liberal arts institution. Admission by selection only. Substitutes for Discourse II. Prerequisite: HONR1010. ELO1B Communication, GE1A Foundational Skills-Writing and Communication.

    • MATH1200Mathematics for Liberal Arts
      MATH1200 Mathematics for Liberal Arts - 3 s.h.

      An overview of selected applications of mathematics for non-majors. Graph theory, cryptography, and voting theory. ELO6 Math, GE2B Foundational Skills-Mathematics/Quantitative.

    • MATH1280College Algebra
      MATH1280 College Algebra - 3 s.h.

      Solutions of polynomial, rational and radical equations, systems of equations, matrices, sequences, series, functions, exponentials. Prerequisite: 2 years high school algebra. ELO6 Math, GE2B Foundational Skills-Mathematics/Quantitative.

    • MATH1310Mathematical Concepts
      MATH1310 Mathematical Concepts - 3 s.h.

      A systematic development of whole number systems, geometry, set theory, counting, measurement, and algebra. Prerequisite: 1 year high school algebra; geometry recommended. ELO6 Math, GE2B Foundational Skills-Mathematics/Quantitative.

    • MATH1360Statistics for Critical Thinking
      MATH1360 Statistics for Critical Thinking - 3 s.h.

      A critical thinking approach to data analysis, measures of central tendency, dispersion, correlation, probability, estimation and hypothesis testing. Prerequisite: 1 year high school algebra. ELO6 Math, GE2B Foundational Skills-Mathematics/Quantitative.

    • MATH1370Statistics for Sciences
      MATH1370 Statistics for Sciences - 3 s.h.

      Data analysis and measures of central tendency, dispersion, and correlation. Introduction to probability. Estimation and hypothesis testing. Bivariate regression. ANOVA. Introduction to nonparametric techniques. Prerequisite: 1 year high school algebra. ELO6 Math, GE2B Foundational Skills-Mathematics/Quantitative.

    • MATH1500Applied Calculus
      MATH1500 Applied Calculus - 3 s.h.

      An introduction to differential and integral calculus. Topics include limits, continuity, differentiation and integration techniques, and applications. Prerequisite: 2 years high school algebra. ELO6 Math, GE2B Foundational Skills-Mathematics/Quantitative.

    • MATH1510Calculus I
      MATH1510 Calculus I - 4 s.h.

      Limits, continuity, differentiation, and applications including exponential, logarithmic, trigonometric, and inverse functions. Mean value theorem, curve sketching, Riemann sums, and the fundamental theorem of calculus. Prerequisite: 2 years high school algebra. ELO6 Math, GE2B Foundational Skills-Mathematics/Quantitative.

    • MATH2350Discrete Mathematics
      MATH2350 Discrete Mathematics - 3 s.h.

      A survey of topics in discrete mathematics focusing on introductory logic, methods of mathematical proof, set theory, determinants and matrices, combinatorics, and graph theory. Prerequisite: Instructor approval for non-CSIT/MATH majors, 2 years high school algebra or MATH1280. ELO6 Math, GE2B Foundational Skills-Mathematics/Quantitative.

    • MUSC3340Musical Citizenship: Artistic Activism and Social Justice
      MUSC3340 Musical Citizenship: Artistic Activism and Social Justice - 3 s.h.

      This course will focus on how music has historically been used for social justice, activism, and reform both within the United States and worldwide. Additionally, it will foster critical discussion and reflection on a wide range of artistic activism and applied research. What is musical activism? What kind of social responsibilities do music researchers have? Can music be used to bring about social justice? Music has long been used by movements seeking social change. People from around the world have used music as a platform to speak up and sing out about injustices. This course will focus discussion on the sounds and sentiments of social activism in the public sphere and the value and challenge of cultural advocacy in civil society. From protest songs of the Civil Rights Movement, to music concerts for charity causes, to freedom songs of the African Americans, to the Singing Revolution of the country of Estonia, to songs of the LGBTQ movement, to the Sigauque Project in Mozambique, to the protest songs of the American union movement… and so on. Through readings, discussion, and in-depth analysis of these different songs and movements, students would gain knowledge of efforts to bring about both cultural and social change throughout the world. ELO5 Arts - Equality and Peace, GE3A Liberal Learning-Arts.

    • MUSC3350From Louis Armstrong to Lady Gaga: A History of American Popular Music
      MUSC3350 From Louis Armstrong to Lady Gaga: A History of American Popular Music - 3 s.h.

      This course examines the historical significance of popular music in the United States from the late nineteenth century to the present. This course will focus on learning how to describe and identify the musical characteristics that differentiate American popular music styles and how they have evolved to create new styles within the pop genre, by focusing on the historical, socio-cultural, political, and economic forces. No formal musical training is necessary to enroll in the course. GE3A Liberal Learning-Arts.

    • PSYC1300Introductory Psychology
      PSYC1300 Introductory Psychology - 3 s.h.

      An introductory survey of psychological methods and thoughts as they relate to human experience and behavior. Topics include the role of the central nervous system in mediating behavior, learning and memory, states of awareness, motivation and emotion, personality, psychological disorders, and therapy. Goal 1C, ELO5 Social Science - Innovation

    • PSYC2250Developmental Psychology
      PSYC2250 Developmental Psychology - 3 s.h.

      The study of human development over the entire lifespan. Focus is on the interaction of physical, intellectual, social, and emotional aspects of development. ELO5 Social Science - Equality, ELO5 Social Science - Equality and Peace

    • SCIE1200Integrated Science with Lab
      SCIE1200 Integrated Science with Lab - 4 s.h.

      A broad overview of concepts from earth and space science (e.g., physical and historical geology, structure and processes of the hydrosphere, and astronomy), life sciences (e.g., structure and function of cells, levels of organization, genetics, evolution, classification and characteristics of the major groups of organisms, structures and functions of plant organs and systems, anatomy and physiology of animals (including human body systems), and ecology), and physical sciences (e.g., structure and properties of matter, relationships between energy and matter, chemical reactions, mechanics, electricity, magnetism, waves, and optics). Not intended for science majors. Additional fee required. Fulfills liberal learning science course. GE3D Liberal Learning-Natural Sciences

    • THTR1230Theatre and Society
      THTR1230 Theatre and Society - 3 s.h.

      Designed to develop an understanding of how Theatre and society coexist in our world. Course fosters an appreciation for the theatre artist’s skills and expertise. In this course students experience acting, design, and playwriting through collaborative group projects and interactive assignments. Students will explore the complex relationship between Theatre and society from the past to the present through presentations and class discussions. ELO5 Arts - Equality, ELO5 Arts - Equality and Peace, GE3A Liberal Learning-Arts.

    ARTS2330Art History: Innovation and Politics ARTS3110Art History: Activism, Empathy and Justice BIOL1200Environmental Science with Lab (also CHEM1200) BIOL2580Drug Development and Society with Lab CHEM1200Environmental Science with Lab (also BIOL1200) CHEM1330Introduction to General, Organic, and Biochemistry with Lab CHEM1340Forensic Chemistry with Lab CHEM1410General Chemistry I Workshop with Lab COMM1100Foundations of Public Speaking COMM1250Introduction to Communication Theory COMM2110Intercultural Communication COMM2300Introduction to Media Technologies COMM2500Introduction to Mass Media ECON1300Principles of Macroeconomics ECON1320Principles of Microeconomics EDUC2120Human Relations ENGL1100Composition I: Introduction to Writing ENGL2110Composition II: Research Writing and Argumentation ENGL2370World Literature ENGL2903Topics in Literature ENGL3480Cultural Studies HIST1200History of the African Diaspora HIST1320World Civilizations II HIST2420United States History Since 1877 HONR1010Honors 101 HONR2010Honors 201 MATH1200Mathematics for Liberal Arts MATH1280College Algebra MATH1310Mathematical Concepts MATH1360Statistics for Critical Thinking MATH1370Statistics for Sciences MATH1500Applied Calculus MATH1510Calculus I MATH2350Discrete Mathematics MUSC3340Musical Citizenship: Artistic Activism and Social Justice MUSC3350From Louis Armstrong to Lady Gaga: A History of American Popular Music PSYC1300Introductory Psychology PSYC2250Developmental Psychology SCIE1200Integrated Science with Lab THTR1230Theatre and Society
    Course Descriptions
    ARTS2330 Art History: Innovation and Politics - 3 s.h.

    Theme-based art history course exploring topics such as innovation, power, politics, architecture, entertainment, sacred spaces, sustainability, and eco art throughout art history to the present. ELO5 Arts - Innovation, GE3A Liberal Learning-Arts.

    ARTS3110 Art History: Activism, Empathy and Justice - 3 s.h.

    Theme-based art history course that explores topics such as activism, empathy, justice, disability, mental illness, feminism, sexuality, queer art, social and civic engagement, labor, and race throughout art history to the present. ELO5 Arts - Equality, ELO5 Arts - Equality and Peace, GE3A Liberal Learning-Arts.

    BIOL1200 Environmental Science with Lab (also CHEM1200) - 4 s.h.

    An exploration of the biotic and abiotic components of the environment, including the biological, physical, and chemical processes that shape natural ecosystems (e.g., biogeochemical cycles). The course will also examine the impact of human population growth, resource use, emissions production, and technological innovations on the environment. Current environmental issues, such as loss of biodiversity, ecosystem degradation, air and water pollution, and climate change, will be considered. Additional fee required. ELO6 Science - Innovation, GE3D Liberal Learning-Natural Sciences

    BIOL2580 Drug Development and Society with Lab - 4 s.h.

    This course will offer students the experience of critically reviewing scientific questions using scientific method that applies to the discovery and development of medicines. The course will explore science of drug discovery, development, and federal regulation of drugs. Additional fee required. ELO6 Science - Innovation, GE3D Liberal Learning-Natural Sciences.

    CHEM1200 Environmental Science with Lab (also BIOL1200) - 4 s.h.

    An exploration of the biotic and abiotic components of the environment, including the biological, physical, and chemical processes that shape natural ecosystems (e.g., biogeochemical cycles). The course will also examine the impact of human population growth, resource use, emissions production, and technological innovations on the environment. Current environmental issues, such as loss of biodiversity, ecosystem degradation, air and water pollution, and climate change, will be considered. Additional fee required. ELO6 Science - Innovation, GE3D Liberal Learning-Natural Sciences.

    CHEM1330 Introduction to General, Organic, and Biochemistry with Lab - 4 s.h.

    An introduction to the principles of inorganic, organic and biochemistry, including a study of atoms, chemical bonding, types of chemical reactions (focusing on ones in the cell), solution chemistry, introduction of biological molecules (proteins, lipids, carbohydrates, and nucleic acids). This course is intended for students desiring a general education in chemistry, those majoring in nursing or allied health fields and those that need it to fulfill the chemistry requirement for cell biology and genetics course. Prerequisite: MATH1280 or one year of high school algebra (C or better strongly recommended). Additional fees required. GE3D Liberal Learning-Natural Sciences

    CHEM1340 Forensic Chemistry with Lab - 4 s.h.

    This course will expose students to the field of forensic science primarily using chemical forensics and testing. Topics include evidence collection and preservation, drugs and drug chemistry, heat and explosions, poisons and others. The course will cover basic chemical concepts needed to plan, execute, and interpret forensic results. All necessary scientific concepts will be developed in the context of forensic science. Additional fee required. ELO6 Science - World Citizenship, ELO6 Science - Innovation, GE3D Liberal Learning-Natural Sciences

    CHEM1410 General Chemistry I Workshop with Lab - 4 s.h.

    General Chemistry I Workshop is appropriate for any student interested in developing a strong background in chemistry. It is intended to be the first university chemistry course for science majors. As such, it will be fairly rigorous and will draw upon previous experience in mathematics and science. Major areas to be covered include atomic and molecular structures, chemical bonding, stoichiometric relationships, and chemical reactions. Laboratory activities and experiments are closely related to concepts introduced in class discussions and will allow students to develop their laboratory skills. Good safety practices and experimental record keeping will be stressed. Students are expected to actively participate in class activities and discussions in addition to homework assignments, individual/group study and preparation for exams. Course is intended for biology, chemistry, and some allied health majors. Additional fee required. Fulfills liberal learning science course. Prerequisites: MATH1280 and CHEM1310 or one year of high school chemistry. EL06 Science, GE3D Liberal Learning-Natural Sciences.

    COMM1100 Foundations of Public Speaking - 3 s.h.

    Foundations of Public Speaking focuses on practices in the speech processes of writing, delivery, listening, audience analysis, criticism, and performance of introductory, informative, persuasive, and mediated speeches. The course introduces foundations of academic research and provides students with the skillset to expand their critical thinking and speaking to meet the dynamic demands of public communication. The emphasis of the course is on learning through performance and application of communication principles and tools. In order for students to complete the foundation skills sequence, they must earn a grade of C or higher in this class. Prerequisite C or better in ENGL1100. ELO1B Communications, GE1B Foundational Skills-Writing and Communication.

    COMM1250 Introduction to Communication Theory - 3 s.h.

    Survey of the major theories that support research and study of communication, such as interpersonal communication, organizational communication, rhetoric, media, culture, and ethics. The course gives students a foundation in communication vocabulary, basic knowledge of key theories, and an introduction to practical application of theory to human communication. Offered every Fall. ELO5 Humanities - Innovation, GE3C Liberal Learning-Humanities.

    COMM2110 Intercultural Communication - 3 s.h.

    An examination of concepts that have application to communication across cultural boundaries, with emphasis on relating them to effective intercultural communication skGE3C Liberal Learning-Humanities. ELO4 Global Learning - World Citizenship, ELO4 Global Learning - Equality and Peace, GE3C Liberal Learning-Humanities. +This course is only offered every other year.

    COMM2300 Introduction to Media Technologies - 3 s.h.

    Introduction to the primary mass media forms - newspapers, books, magazines, radio, television, sound recording, movies, and the Internet - to gain an understanding of the ways they operate. Included are industries based on mass media, journalism, advertising, and public relations?as well mass media theory, law, and ethics. Emphasis on critical thinking about the mass media. +This course is only offered every other year.

    COMM2500 Introduction to Mass Media - 3 s.h.

    An examination of the various landmark theories, such as rhetorical, Marxist, and feminist to analyze popular culture, with an emphasis on the importance of communication in the production and consumption of culture. Students will study the development of culture by applying different theories or 'lenses' to cultural artifacts including music, movies, advertisements, clothing, etc. GE3C Liberal Learning-Humanities +This course is only offered every other year.

    ECON1300 Principles of Macroeconomics - 3 s.h.

    Analysis of the fundamental principles of the American economic system, centering on price, national income, international trade and finance, fiscal policy, monetary policy, money, and banking. Prerequisite: 1 year high school algebra; geometry recommended. Goal 1C, ELO5 Social Science - World Citizenship, ELO5 Social Science - Innovation

    ECON1320 Principles of Microeconomics - 3 s.h.

    Analysis of the fundamental principles of the American economic system, centering on price, production, market structures, and a survey of contemporary economic problems, e.g. sustainability. Goal 1C, ELO5 Social Science - Sustainability

    EDUC2120 Human Relations - 3 s.h.

    Analysis of various societal subgroups and how such groups recognize and deal with dehumanizing biases. Students learn to relate effectively to various groups to foster understanding and respect for equity, diversity, and inclusion. Emphasis on self-awareness in human relations issues and how this awareness can be translated into positive relationships. Introduction to ethnographic analysis and pedagogical, curricular, and social considerations involved in working with and educating various societal subgroups. ELO3 Ethical Thinking and Action - Equality, ELO3 Ethical Thinking and Action - Equality and Peace, GE3E Liberal Learning-Social Sciences

    ENGL1100 Composition I: Introduction to Writing - 3 s.h.

    This is a writing-intensive course preparing students to become stronger, more confident writers as they develop their writing process habits and their ability to think critically about arguments around them. Students can expect to produce, deliver, and analyze college-level, written texts in addition to learning about grammar-use in context with an emphasis on meaning within the editing process. In order for students to complete the foundation skills sequence, they must earn a grade of C or higher in this class. In order to move on to COMM1100, students must earn the grade of a "C" or higher. Corequisite for students with ACT English score of 15 and below, or an SAT English score of 480 and below: ENGL1110 unless they have taken two high school English courses, one of which must be or prominently require composition (not creative writing), with a grade of "C" or better in both. ELO1A Communication, GE1A Foundational Skills-Writing and Communication. Corequisite for students with ACT English score of 15 and below, or an SAT English score of 480 and below: ENGL1110 unless they have taken two high school English courses, one of which must be or prominently require composition (not creative writing), with a grade of "C" or better in both. ELO1A Communication, GE1A Foundational Skills-Writing and Communication

    ENGL2110 Composition II: Research Writing and Argumentation - 3 s.h.

    This is a writing-intensive course that is meant to develop students’ academic research processes. Students should expect to engage in work that is framed for “public” audiences outside of the classroom and to practice collaboration in research and writing processes. As the final course of the foundational communication skills sequence, students will be encouraged to use research processes to gain an awareness of topics and conversations happening in the larger social world. In order for students to complete the foundational skills sequence, they must earn a grade of C or higher in this class. Prerequisite C or better in ENGL1100 and COMM1100. ELO1B Communication, GE1C Foundational Skills-Writing and Communication.

    ENGL2370 World Literature - 3 s.h.

    Examines literary works by authors from a broad range of artistic and cultural traditions, emphasizing literature in translation. Designed to offer students an introduction to literature as a point of access into global communities. Goal 2B, ELO5 Humanities - World Citizenship, ELO5 Humanities - Sustainability, GE3C Liberal Learning-Humanities. +This course is only offered every other year.

    ENGL2903 Topics in Literature - 3 s.h.

    Special studies in Literature designed primarily for the non-English major. Content may vary and will be announced at time of offering. When content changes, course may be repeated for credit. GE3C Liberal Learning-Humanities

    ENGL3480 Cultural Studies - 3 s.h.

    Explores cultural systems of meaning and attendant issues of power, particularly in terms of class, gender, nation, race, nature, and sexuality. Emphasis on commercial and media culture. ELO5 Humanities - Equality, ELO5 Humanities - Equality and Peace. +This course is only offered every other year.

    HIST1200 History of the African Diaspora - 3 s.h.

    A history of the people of African descent in the Americas, including the United States, as well as the Caribbean, Central and South America. Issues of survival and resistance, the persistence of racism and white supremacy, and struggles for freedom, across countries and time periods, will be stressed. Goal 4, ELO5 Histories - Equality, ELO5 Histories - Equality and Peace, GE3B Liberal Learning-Histories.

    HIST1320 World Civilizations II - 3 s.h.

    An introductory survey of selected world civilizations from the emergence of Western Europe as a center of world power. The impact of Western civilizations upon the development of other world civilizations and the contemporary emergence of a global perspective will be stressed. Goal 4, ELO5 Histories - World Citizenship, ELO5 Histories - Innovation, GE3B Liberal Learning-Histories.

    HIST2420 United States History Since 1877 - 3 s.h.

    A survey of the personalities, events, and ideas that have shaped United States history since the Civil War and Reconstruction. Emphasis upon the rise of the industrial United States, 20th century adjustments to prosperity, depression and world war, and the political, social, and economic changes since World War II. Goal 1B, ELO5 Histories - Innovation, GE3B Liberal Learning-Histories.

    HONR1010 Honors 101 - 3 s.h.

    Interdisciplinary first-year seminar provides a common intellectual experience for new Honors students and introduces them to the culture and opportunities of a small liberal arts institution. Designed to help exceptional students produce, deliver, and, analyze written and oral texts and learn how written and oral performances function together in specific discourse communities. Substitutes for Discourse I. Admission by selection only. ELO1A Communication, GE1B Foundational Skills-Writing and Communication.

    HONR2010 Honors 201 - 3 s.h.

    The second of two sequenced interdisciplinary Honors seminars focused on developing the skills of written and oral communication, critical inquiry, and research. Students produce, deliver, and analyze college-level written and oral texts based on sustained academic research, and continue to develop their understanding of critical discourse analysis and critical language awareness in the context of a range of discursive forms (written, oral, visual and/or multimedia). Reinforces the common intellectual experience of the Honors program and further exposes students to the culture and opportunities of a small liberal arts institution. Admission by selection only. Substitutes for Discourse II. Prerequisite: HONR1010. ELO1B Communication, GE1A Foundational Skills-Writing and Communication.

    MATH1200 Mathematics for Liberal Arts - 3 s.h.

    An overview of selected applications of mathematics for non-majors. Graph theory, cryptography, and voting theory. ELO6 Math, GE2B Foundational Skills-Mathematics/Quantitative.

    MATH1280 College Algebra - 3 s.h.

    Solutions of polynomial, rational and radical equations, systems of equations, matrices, sequences, series, functions, exponentials. Prerequisite: 2 years high school algebra. ELO6 Math, GE2B Foundational Skills-Mathematics/Quantitative.

    MATH1310 Mathematical Concepts - 3 s.h.

    A systematic development of whole number systems, geometry, set theory, counting, measurement, and algebra. Prerequisite: 1 year high school algebra; geometry recommended. ELO6 Math, GE2B Foundational Skills-Mathematics/Quantitative.

    MATH1360 Statistics for Critical Thinking - 3 s.h.

    A critical thinking approach to data analysis, measures of central tendency, dispersion, correlation, probability, estimation and hypothesis testing. Prerequisite: 1 year high school algebra. ELO6 Math, GE2B Foundational Skills-Mathematics/Quantitative.

    MATH1370 Statistics for Sciences - 3 s.h.

    Data analysis and measures of central tendency, dispersion, and correlation. Introduction to probability. Estimation and hypothesis testing. Bivariate regression. ANOVA. Introduction to nonparametric techniques. Prerequisite: 1 year high school algebra. ELO6 Math, GE2B Foundational Skills-Mathematics/Quantitative.

    MATH1500 Applied Calculus - 3 s.h.

    An introduction to differential and integral calculus. Topics include limits, continuity, differentiation and integration techniques, and applications. Prerequisite: 2 years high school algebra. ELO6 Math, GE2B Foundational Skills-Mathematics/Quantitative.

    MATH1510 Calculus I - 4 s.h.

    Limits, continuity, differentiation, and applications including exponential, logarithmic, trigonometric, and inverse functions. Mean value theorem, curve sketching, Riemann sums, and the fundamental theorem of calculus. Prerequisite: 2 years high school algebra. ELO6 Math, GE2B Foundational Skills-Mathematics/Quantitative.

    MATH2350 Discrete Mathematics - 3 s.h.

    A survey of topics in discrete mathematics focusing on introductory logic, methods of mathematical proof, set theory, determinants and matrices, combinatorics, and graph theory. Prerequisite: Instructor approval for non-CSIT/MATH majors, 2 years high school algebra or MATH1280. ELO6 Math, GE2B Foundational Skills-Mathematics/Quantitative.

    MUSC3340 Musical Citizenship: Artistic Activism and Social Justice - 3 s.h.

    This course will focus on how music has historically been used for social justice, activism, and reform both within the United States and worldwide. Additionally, it will foster critical discussion and reflection on a wide range of artistic activism and applied research. What is musical activism? What kind of social responsibilities do music researchers have? Can music be used to bring about social justice? Music has long been used by movements seeking social change. People from around the world have used music as a platform to speak up and sing out about injustices. This course will focus discussion on the sounds and sentiments of social activism in the public sphere and the value and challenge of cultural advocacy in civil society. From protest songs of the Civil Rights Movement, to music concerts for charity causes, to freedom songs of the African Americans, to the Singing Revolution of the country of Estonia, to songs of the LGBTQ movement, to the Sigauque Project in Mozambique, to the protest songs of the American union movement… and so on. Through readings, discussion, and in-depth analysis of these different songs and movements, students would gain knowledge of efforts to bring about both cultural and social change throughout the world. ELO5 Arts - Equality and Peace, GE3A Liberal Learning-Arts.

    MUSC3350 From Louis Armstrong to Lady Gaga: A History of American Popular Music - 3 s.h.

    This course examines the historical significance of popular music in the United States from the late nineteenth century to the present. This course will focus on learning how to describe and identify the musical characteristics that differentiate American popular music styles and how they have evolved to create new styles within the pop genre, by focusing on the historical, socio-cultural, political, and economic forces. No formal musical training is necessary to enroll in the course. GE3A Liberal Learning-Arts.

    PSYC1300 Introductory Psychology - 3 s.h.

    An introductory survey of psychological methods and thoughts as they relate to human experience and behavior. Topics include the role of the central nervous system in mediating behavior, learning and memory, states of awareness, motivation and emotion, personality, psychological disorders, and therapy. Goal 1C, ELO5 Social Science - Innovation

    PSYC2250 Developmental Psychology - 3 s.h.

    The study of human development over the entire lifespan. Focus is on the interaction of physical, intellectual, social, and emotional aspects of development. ELO5 Social Science - Equality, ELO5 Social Science - Equality and Peace

    SCIE1200 Integrated Science with Lab - 4 s.h.

    A broad overview of concepts from earth and space science (e.g., physical and historical geology, structure and processes of the hydrosphere, and astronomy), life sciences (e.g., structure and function of cells, levels of organization, genetics, evolution, classification and characteristics of the major groups of organisms, structures and functions of plant organs and systems, anatomy and physiology of animals (including human body systems), and ecology), and physical sciences (e.g., structure and properties of matter, relationships between energy and matter, chemical reactions, mechanics, electricity, magnetism, waves, and optics). Not intended for science majors. Additional fee required. Fulfills liberal learning science course. GE3D Liberal Learning-Natural Sciences

    THTR1230 Theatre and Society - 3 s.h.

    Designed to develop an understanding of how Theatre and society coexist in our world. Course fosters an appreciation for the theatre artist’s skills and expertise. In this course students experience acting, design, and playwriting through collaborative group projects and interactive assignments. Students will explore the complex relationship between Theatre and society from the past to the present through presentations and class discussions. ELO5 Arts - Equality, ELO5 Arts - Equality and Peace, GE3A Liberal Learning-Arts.

  • Alternative General Education Program

    Alternative General Education Program
    Students entering Graceland with 48 or more s.h. of transfer credit or students entering online or completion programs automatically qualify for the Alternative General Education program. Students must complete a total of 33 s.h. including:

    1. 3 s.h. in each of the following areas: speech, college-level mathematics, and natural science.
    2. 6 s.h. in college composition.
    3. 9 s.h. in each of the following areas: humanities (literature, philosophy, religion, art, music, theatre, and foreign language courses), social sciences (economics, psychology, sociology, anthropology, political science/government, geography, history).
  • Life and Leadership

    Life and Leadership

    Designed to correlate students’ extracurricular activities with what they learn in the classrooms, the 16 credit hours spread over the 4 years provides a systematic application of leadership principles to real world experience, with each year bringing an increasingly broad focus to this component of the Transformational Leadership Major.

    The Life and Leadership sequence of courses includes the following courses. (16 s.h.)

    Courses Offered
    • LEAD1100Self-Leadership I
      LEAD1100 Self-Leadership I - 2 s.h.

      Self-Leadership I introduces students to college life and foundational life and leadership skills with the orientation of the student as the person of interest. Students will complete Orientation to College Life, recognize inside-and-outside-the-classroom opportunities, assess personal talents, define leadership orientations, identify personal strengths/weaknesses, and recognize areas for personal growth and improvement. Students will be introduced to Graceland’s five Learning Outcomes: Higher-order Thinking, Character, Social Responsibility, Holistic Well-Being, and Digital Citizenship.

    • LEAD1200Self-Leadership II
      LEAD1200 Self-Leadership II - 2 s.h.

      Self-Leadership II builds upon concepts from Orientation to College Life, continues to develop students' foundational life and leadership skills, and challenges students to expand/reflect upon inside-and-outside-the-classroom involvement. Students will expand on Orientation to College Life including themes centering around communication, organization, collaboration, listening, and self-awareness. Students will grow co-curricular circles, develop inside-and-outside-the-classroom identity, recognize leadership styles, and continue reflection of self-growth and leadership development. Students will identify how Higher-order Thinking, Character, Social Responsibility, Holistic Well-Being, and Digital Citizenship are integrated into learning at Graceland.

    • LEAD2100Group Leadership I
      LEAD2100 Group Leadership I - 2 s.h.

      Group Leadership I translates personal life and leadership skills into the group setting while introducing additional complementary topics such as: extrinsic/intrinsic motivation, emotional intelligence, inclusivity, trust, group dynamics, and group roles. Students will enroll in, complete, and reflect upon one of the SkillPath Leadership Academy courses. Students will understand the roles of Higher-order Thinking, Character, Social Responsibility, Holistic Well-Being, and Digital Citizenship in group leadership.

    • LEAD2200Group Leadership II
      LEAD2200 Group Leadership II - 2 s.h.

      Group Leadership II continues to translate personal life and leadership skills into additional group settings while further developing skills such as: extrinsic/intrinsic motivation, emotional intelligence, inclusivity, trust, group dynamics, and group roles. Students will enroll in, complete, and reflect upon one of the SkillPath Leadership Academy courses. Students will discuss applications of Higher-order Thinking, Character, Social Responsibility, Holistic Well-Being, and Digital Citizenship in group leadership.

    • LEAD3100Organizational Leadership I
      LEAD3100 Organizational Leadership I - 2 s.h.

      Organizational Leadership I applies leadership skills beyond individuals and groups to the organizational level. Students will explore social intelligence, conflict management and resolution, bias assessment, information collection, and evidence assessment. Students will enroll in, complete, and reflect upon one of the SkillPath Leadership Academy courses. Students will apply Higher-order Thinking, Character, Social Responsibility, Holistic Well-Being, and Digital Citizenship in organizational leadership.

    • LEAD3200Organizational Leadership II
      LEAD3200 Organizational Leadership II - 2 s.h.

      Organizational Leadership II further expands leadership skills beyond individuals and groups in the organizational level. Students will further develop social intelligence, conflict management and resolution, bias assessment, information collection, and evidence assessment. Students will enroll in, complete, and reflect upon one of the SkillPath Leadership Academy courses. Students will apply Higher-order Thinking, Character, Social Responsibility, Holistic Well-Being, and Digital Citizenship in organizational leadership.

    • LEAD4100Life and Leadership Practicum I
      LEAD4100 Life and Leadership Practicum I - 2 s.h.

      Life and Leadership Practicum I is a transition course for seniors. Students will conclude and reflect upon skills/tools from leadership of self, groups, and organizations while introducing skills necessary for success and meaning beyond Graceland University. Students will explore change management, psychological resiliency, and financial education. Students will enroll in, complete, and reflect upon one of the SkillPath Leadership Academy courses. Students will evaluate their own ability to apply Higher-order Thinking, Character, Social Responsibility, Holistic Well-Being, and Digital Citizenship in a leadership role at Graceland.

    • LEAD4200Life and Leadership Practicum II
      LEAD4200 Life and Leadership Practicum II - 2 s.h.

      Life and Leadership Practicum II is the capstone to the LEAD series at Graceland University. Students will apply and share with the university their holistic development as a student over their time at Graceland University including their development both inside and outside the classroom to build confidence in the leadership skills they have developed for their futures. Students will enroll in, complete, and reflect upon one of the SkillPath Leadership Academy courses. Students will evaluate their own ability to apply Higher-order Thinking, Character, Social Responsibility, Holistic Well-Being, and Digital Citizenship in current and future leadership roles.

    LEAD1100Self-Leadership I LEAD1200Self-Leadership II LEAD2100Group Leadership I LEAD2200Group Leadership II LEAD3100Organizational Leadership I LEAD3200Organizational Leadership II LEAD4100Life and Leadership Practicum I LEAD4200Life and Leadership Practicum II
    Course Descriptions
    LEAD1100 Self-Leadership I - 2 s.h.

    Self-Leadership I introduces students to college life and foundational life and leadership skills with the orientation of the student as the person of interest. Students will complete Orientation to College Life, recognize inside-and-outside-the-classroom opportunities, assess personal talents, define leadership orientations, identify personal strengths/weaknesses, and recognize areas for personal growth and improvement. Students will be introduced to Graceland’s five Learning Outcomes: Higher-order Thinking, Character, Social Responsibility, Holistic Well-Being, and Digital Citizenship.

    LEAD1200 Self-Leadership II - 2 s.h.

    Self-Leadership II builds upon concepts from Orientation to College Life, continues to develop students' foundational life and leadership skills, and challenges students to expand/reflect upon inside-and-outside-the-classroom involvement. Students will expand on Orientation to College Life including themes centering around communication, organization, collaboration, listening, and self-awareness. Students will grow co-curricular circles, develop inside-and-outside-the-classroom identity, recognize leadership styles, and continue reflection of self-growth and leadership development. Students will identify how Higher-order Thinking, Character, Social Responsibility, Holistic Well-Being, and Digital Citizenship are integrated into learning at Graceland.

    LEAD2100 Group Leadership I - 2 s.h.

    Group Leadership I translates personal life and leadership skills into the group setting while introducing additional complementary topics such as: extrinsic/intrinsic motivation, emotional intelligence, inclusivity, trust, group dynamics, and group roles. Students will enroll in, complete, and reflect upon one of the SkillPath Leadership Academy courses. Students will understand the roles of Higher-order Thinking, Character, Social Responsibility, Holistic Well-Being, and Digital Citizenship in group leadership.

    LEAD2200 Group Leadership II - 2 s.h.

    Group Leadership II continues to translate personal life and leadership skills into additional group settings while further developing skills such as: extrinsic/intrinsic motivation, emotional intelligence, inclusivity, trust, group dynamics, and group roles. Students will enroll in, complete, and reflect upon one of the SkillPath Leadership Academy courses. Students will discuss applications of Higher-order Thinking, Character, Social Responsibility, Holistic Well-Being, and Digital Citizenship in group leadership.

    LEAD3100 Organizational Leadership I - 2 s.h.

    Organizational Leadership I applies leadership skills beyond individuals and groups to the organizational level. Students will explore social intelligence, conflict management and resolution, bias assessment, information collection, and evidence assessment. Students will enroll in, complete, and reflect upon one of the SkillPath Leadership Academy courses. Students will apply Higher-order Thinking, Character, Social Responsibility, Holistic Well-Being, and Digital Citizenship in organizational leadership.

    LEAD3200 Organizational Leadership II - 2 s.h.

    Organizational Leadership II further expands leadership skills beyond individuals and groups in the organizational level. Students will further develop social intelligence, conflict management and resolution, bias assessment, information collection, and evidence assessment. Students will enroll in, complete, and reflect upon one of the SkillPath Leadership Academy courses. Students will apply Higher-order Thinking, Character, Social Responsibility, Holistic Well-Being, and Digital Citizenship in organizational leadership.

    LEAD4100 Life and Leadership Practicum I - 2 s.h.

    Life and Leadership Practicum I is a transition course for seniors. Students will conclude and reflect upon skills/tools from leadership of self, groups, and organizations while introducing skills necessary for success and meaning beyond Graceland University. Students will explore change management, psychological resiliency, and financial education. Students will enroll in, complete, and reflect upon one of the SkillPath Leadership Academy courses. Students will evaluate their own ability to apply Higher-order Thinking, Character, Social Responsibility, Holistic Well-Being, and Digital Citizenship in a leadership role at Graceland.

    LEAD4200 Life and Leadership Practicum II - 2 s.h.

    Life and Leadership Practicum II is the capstone to the LEAD series at Graceland University. Students will apply and share with the university their holistic development as a student over their time at Graceland University including their development both inside and outside the classroom to build confidence in the leadership skills they have developed for their futures. Students will enroll in, complete, and reflect upon one of the SkillPath Leadership Academy courses. Students will evaluate their own ability to apply Higher-order Thinking, Character, Social Responsibility, Holistic Well-Being, and Digital Citizenship in current and future leadership roles.

  • Life-long Learning

    Life-long Learning

    These three courses set students on a path for life-long learning in the respective areas fundamental to the mission of Graceland University. Students are introduced to and explore a variety of concepts important to these subject areas and which give them skills to use throughout their lifetimes.

    The Life-long Learning sequence of courses includes the following courses. (9 s.h.)

    Courses Offered
    • UNIV1100Digital Fluency and Citizenship
      UNIV1100 Digital Fluency and Citizenship - 3 s.h.

      An introduction to the concepts of responsible activity and practices in the digital world, important software tools, and understanding the use of data and data analytics in the digital economy. The course teaches students relevant skills necessary to analyze data, prepare visualizations of data, and engage in the digital economy.

    • UNIV1200Health and Wholeness
      UNIV1200 Health and Wholeness - 3 s.h.

      Introduces students to foundational concepts in health and wellness as well as practices that promote life-long wholeness, including physical and mental health risk assessment and mitigation.

    • UNIV2100Social Responsibility
      UNIV2100 Social Responsibility - 3 s.h.

      Provides students an introductory foundation in social responsibility and ethics in the context of moral, social, and environmental issues. Students will be given the opportunity to understand how personal views, choices, privileges, and behaviors impact their communities and those of other individuals. Students will learn to engage in compassionate and constructive dialogue about diverse perspectives.

    UNIV1100Digital Fluency and Citizenship UNIV1200Health and Wholeness UNIV2100Social Responsibility
    Course Descriptions
    UNIV1100 Digital Fluency and Citizenship - 3 s.h.

    An introduction to the concepts of responsible activity and practices in the digital world, important software tools, and understanding the use of data and data analytics in the digital economy. The course teaches students relevant skills necessary to analyze data, prepare visualizations of data, and engage in the digital economy.

    UNIV1200 Health and Wholeness - 3 s.h.

    Introduces students to foundational concepts in health and wellness as well as practices that promote life-long wholeness, including physical and mental health risk assessment and mitigation.

    UNIV2100 Social Responsibility - 3 s.h.

    Provides students an introductory foundation in social responsibility and ethics in the context of moral, social, and environmental issues. Students will be given the opportunity to understand how personal views, choices, privileges, and behaviors impact their communities and those of other individuals. Students will learn to engage in compassionate and constructive dialogue about diverse perspectives.

1No more than 8 s.h. of Physical Education activity courses numbered 0000-1000 may be presented toward the 120 hours required for graduation. No more than 2 s.h. of the 8 s.h. applied toward graduation may be earned through varsity athletics.

Up to 12 s.h. of PHED1700/2700/3700/4700 allowed toward total hours for graduation.

Non-music majors may present no more than 8 s.h. of music ensemble credit toward graduation. Music majors may present 12 s.h. of music ensemble credit.

No more than 8 s.h. of Theatre Production Studies/ Advanced Theatre Production Studies may be counted toward credits required for graduation.

No more than two developmental courses, number DEVL0000-1990, may be applied toward graduation.

No more than 4 s.h. of Free Market Practicum (BUAD3350) may be counted toward any graduation requirement.

2A Graceland student engaged in a formal program of study abroad, whether sponsored by a foreign or domestic institution of higher learning, will be considered “in residence” for a maximum of one academic year if he/she has his/her proposed program of study approved in advance by the Registrar and by the chairperson of the division in which he/she plans to major, and if he/she claims intent to complete a degree at Graceland.

3Students who have completed an Associate of Arts (AA) or Associate of Science (AS) degree from a regionally accredited institution of higher education will automatically receive an General Education waiver. A student holding a BA, BS, BSN, or a more advanced degree from an accredited institution other than Graceland desiring to qualify for another major and/or degree is considered to have met the intent of the general education program by completion of the earlier degree. Such a candidate would be required to meet the major course and residence requirements only.

4Students transferring will join the sequence during their first semester at Graceland. Only first-time freshman and transfer freshman entering Graceland during the 2022-23 academic year are required to complete this sequence.

5Students in the online and degree completion programs will follow a different path.

NOTE: A student completing two majors at Graceland on two different graduation dates will receive a second degree only if:

  1. he/she has earned at least 24 semester hours that apply to the second major after completion of the first, and
  2. the two majors normally lead to two different degrees (BA, BS, BSN)

Otherwise students will receive a single degree with a notation on the transcript that a second major has been earned. If a student is awarded a single degree with two or more majors, the student’s declaration of a first major will determine whether the degree awarded will be a BA, BS, or BSN.

NOTE: Only courses that count toward a major may count toward a minor in that subject area.

Participation in Commencement Ceremony

It is the responsibility of the student to apply for graduation preferably one year prior to the anticipated graduation date, but not later than 30 days prior to the graduation ceremony.

Two commencement ceremonies are available each academic year.

  1. Fall Commencement Ceremony – Independence, MO
    1. The only ceremony for those earning graduate degrees during the academic year – MEd, MAR, MNHP, MS, MSN, and DNP. Verification by the Registrar that all degree requirements are anticipated to be completed by the end of the spring trimester will permit participation in the Fall Ceremony. Petitions are not required for these graduates to participate.
    2. The only ceremony for those earning School of Nursing baccalaureate degrees during that academic year — BA, BAH, BSN, and BSNH. Verification by the Registrar that all degree requirements are anticipated to be completed by the end of the spring trimester will permit participation in the Fall Ceremony. Petitions are not required for these graduates to participate.
    3. An optional ceremony for all other baccalaureate graduates during the academic year. Petitions are required for graduates who anticipate completion of requirements by the end of the spring trimester/semester. Petitions are considered by the Curricular Adjustment Committee (CAC).
  2. Spring Commencement Ceremony – Lamoni, IA
    1. The ceremony for those earning baccalaureate degrees during the academic year, excluding School of Nursing BA, BAH, BSN and BSNH. Petitions are required for graduates who want to participate in the ceremony and are not registered for all required courses, but anticipate completion of requirements by the end of the calendar year. Petitions are considered by the Curricular Adjustment Committee (CAC).
  3. Graduates who finish degree requirements during the academic year will attend a ceremony during that academic year, and will not be allowed to choose to attend a ceremony during the next academic year.

Preparing for Graduation

At least twelve months prior to the fall or spring commencement convocations, students wishing to participate in the ceremony must complete and submit an Application for Graduation. Submitting an application will activate a series of communications that will keep applicants informed about possible graduation discrepancies needing to be resolved, ordering caps and gowns, and the schedule of commencement activities. A graduation fee is assessed after receipt of the application.