Performance Scholarship

Theatre Performance Scholarship (pdf)

How to Prepare a Theatre Portfolio
How to Prepare a Theatre Audtion

TO PREPARE A THEATRE PRODUCTION SCHOLARSHIP PORTFOLIO

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DEFINITIONS:
Resume - in the theatre, a one-page document outlining your training and experience in a given area or areas.
Portfolio - in the theatre, a collection of materials which demonstrate your expertise in a given area or areas.

SUGGESTIONS FOR RESUME PREPARATION

  1. Use a word processing program to create and refine your resume.
  2. Put your name and contact information at the top.
  3. Divide your resume into categories, then list your experience in each category.
    For example:
    COSTUME EXPERIENCE
    • Assistant Costume Designer, The Odyssey,Gibson High School
    • Wardrobe Manager/Dresser, Hello, Dolly!, Lane Community Theatre
    • Makeup Designer, Narnia, Gibson High School
    • Makeup Crew, TheFantasticks, Gibson High School
  4. You may also include a list of special skills which may be useful in your technical theatre/design future. (For instance, if you have experience in woodworking, create your own sewing patterns, mixing sound/music, etc. Any experience in visual arts – painting, sculpture, photography, etc. should be included here.)

SUGGESTIONS FOR PORTFOLIO PREPARATION

  1. Whenever you work on a production, keep records and take pictures.
  2. Purchase an appropriate holder for your portfolio. You can buy a traditional portfolio at art supply stores or get a three-ring binder and a set of sheet protectors at an office-supply or discount store.
  3. Prepare an attractive title page with your name and contact information.
  4. Organize your portfolio neatly by categories in the same order as your resume.
  5. Materials in the portfolio may include such things as:

    Sets
    concept statement/research
    design sketches
    finished design renderings (color copies are OK)
    photographs of set models
    working drawings
    scene shift plots
    photographs of set building/painting/decorating process
    photographs of the finished set
    photographs of details of the finished set (stairway, arch, etc.)
    copy of program

    Properties
    concept statement/research
    design sketches
    properties plot
    shopping lists
    photographs of props building process
    photographs of the finished props
    photographs of props on set and/or being used by actors
    copy of program

    Costumes
    concept statement/research
    design sketches
    finished design renderings with fabric swatches (color copies are OK)
    shopping list/pull-from-stock-list/rental list
    costume plots/dressing lists/quick change plots
    photographs of costume building process
    photographs of the finished costumes
    photographs of details of the finished costumes
    copy of program

    Makeup & Hair
    concept statement/research
    sketches
    supply list
    photographs of makeup/hair in process
    photographs of actors in makeup/hair
    copy of program

    Lighting
    concept statement/research
    lighting hang plot
    lighting cue sheet
    photographs of lighting preparation (hanging, focusing,etc.)
    photographs of finished production which show off lighting effects
    copy of program

    Sound
    concept statement/research
    sound plot/cue sheet
    CD of sound cues
    copy of program

    Stage
    copy of prompt script, or a section thereof

     

    Management
    checklists
    rehearsal reports
    production meeting notes
    cue sheets
    copy of program

    Publicity
    sketches of artwork
    rough drafts of program
    rough drafts of poster/flyer
    copy of program
    copy of poster/flyer

    ALSO:

    1. Hand-written documents should be retyped neatly on the computer and printed out.
    2. Items smaller than one page (photographs, cards, etc.) should be mounted on a full sheet of paper.
    3. Letters or cards of thanks or congratulations for your work may also be included.
    4. Coverage of your work in newspapers, newsletters or magazines may also be included.

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS
The materials list is huge!Do I have to include ALL that stuff?
Think of your portfolio as a sample book, providing examples of your work. For a design project, use four to five portfolio pages to demonstrate process and product. For big technical assignments, one to two portfolio pages per assignment will do. Smaller technical assignments may simply be listed on your resume.

I don’t have most of the stuff on this materials list. My portfolio will be small and pathetic!
Gather as much evidence as you can. Check with your teachers/directors and others who worked on the show to see if they have materials to loan, copy or give to you. Find out if parents, friends or classmates took pictures. If costumes or props are in storage, dig them out and take pictures. Reconstruct lists, plots or cue sheets if you need to.

Should I include original documents in my portfolio?
While original documents are lovely, there is always the danger of your portfolio being lost in the mail or damaged in some way. We recommend that you use high-quality copies rather than original work whenever possible.

I live far away from Lamoni, Iowa. Can I mail you my resume and portfolio?
Yes, provided you follow the instructions above.

May I submit an electronic resume and portfolio?
Absolutely. Send it by email, on a CD or post it on the internet and inform us of the URL.

If I receive a Theatre Production Grant, where does the money go?
Theatre Production Grant funds are applied to the cost of your tuition. For example, a grant of $1000 would be distributed Fall semester ($500) and Spring semester($500).

If I receive a Theatre Production Grant, what do I do next?
- Enroll in THTR2350 Theatre Production Studies.
- Attend a Theatre Orientation Meeting at the beginning of the semester.
- Participate in at least one theatre production per semester.
- Maintain a 2.8 GPA.
More specific information will be provided in a Grant Confirmation Letter from the Financial Aid office.

Once I have received a Theatre Production Grant, can I lose it?
If you fail to complete the Grant requirements for any semester that grant funds are given, your grant may be revoked.

 

PREPARE A THEATRE PRODUCTION GRANT AUDITION

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Monologue – in the theatre, a section of dialogue written for one character to speak. In a script it will appear as a long paragraph or two.
Audition – the solo presentation of a monologue which showcases your physical, vocal, and imaginative skills as an actor. An audition will generally have a time limit which you must honor (in this case, 2-3 minutes).
One-Act Play – a script at least 20 pages long.
Full-Length Play – a script at least 70 pages long.

1. Choose a monologue from a one-act or full-length play.
- Choose a script by an established playwright to guarantee quality material (see list below).
- Pick a character that you could realistically play, who is close to your age and type.
- DO NOT use monologues that are written as stand-alone pieces (without a play).
- Avoid dialects, unless it is only for a phrase or two. Speak clearly and without an accent.
- Time your selection to be sure it is an appropriate length. If you need to shorten the speech, start later, or end sooner. Do not cut sentences out of the middle.

2. Read the play carefully to develop an understanding of the character you are portraying. (The more times you read the play, the better your characterization will be.)
- Know who the character is speaking to and why.
- Consider what the character’s goal is and how the character pursues that goal.
- Consider the character’s physical life (gestures, expression, movement, etc.).
- Consider the character’s vocal life (volume, pitch, range, tempo/rhythm, etc.).

3. Auditions usually allow the use of a chair if desired.
- If you use a chair, find creative ways to use it; don’t sit down the whole time.
- If you do not use a chair, feel free to move, but keep within a given space. (Imagine you are working in a pool of light 15 feet in diameter; stay in the light.)
- Place your imaginary listener downstage to your right or left. (This allows you to deliver your monologue facing the audience.)

3. Break the monologue up into logical units.
- Memorize and work on each unit separately; then put them together.
- Incorporate appropriate physical and vocal variety to tell the story and keep the audience engaged.
- Practice the monologue until you have it firmly in your mind and body.

4. When you are ready to present, dress nicely, as if you were going to a job interview.
- Wearing an outfit that you feel makes you look good will give you confidence.
- Arrange your hair so it does not hang in your face, and keep jewelry to a minimum.

5. Present your audition in this manner:
- Walk confidently to center stage and face front.
- Say “Hello! My name is (state your name). I will be presenting a monologue from (name of play) by (playwright’s name), playing the role of (character’s name).”
- Take a moment to position yourself and get into character.
- Perform your monologue.
- Hold still for a moment at the end of your monologue.
- As yourself, say “Thank you!”
- If your audition is live, stay and wait for instructions from the auditor.

SUGGESTIONS FOR MONOLOGUE MATERIAL:
Choose a monologue from a play by any of these playwrights
Rebecca Gilman, David Ives, Larry Shue, John Guare, George S. Kaufman, Wendy Wasserstein, Horton Foote, Barbara Lebow, Lanford Wilson, Moss Hart, Donald Margulies, Tennessee Williams, Lillian Hellman, Arthur Miller

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS
Why can’t I use a monologue that was written to stand alone?
A script gives you a substantial amount of material from which to create a character, which is the actor’s job.
A stand-alone monologue uses a different set of skills than a monologue from a play.

Why do I have to give the name of the playwright when I introduce my monologue?
The playwright worked very hard to create the character you are portraying. Giving the playwright’s name respectfully acknowledges him or her for providing the material you are using for your audition.

I live far away from Lamoni, Iowa. Will you accept a video of my audition?
Yes, provided you follow the instructions above. Label your video with your name and the filming date.

I was in my high school play, and we videotaped it. Can I just send you the videotape?
No. A production is not an audition; its focus is on making everything work together.
An audition is a more useful medium for the college professor who is considering your abilities.

I really like musical theatre. Can I apply for a Music grant as well as a Theatre grant?
Yes. The Music Department has its own application process; contact the Graceland Admissions Office for information.

If I receive a Theatre Production Grant, where does the money go?
Theatre Production Grant funds are applied to the cost of your tuition. For example, a grant of $1000 would be distributed Fall semester ($500) and Spring semester ($500).

If I receive a Theatre Production Grant, what do I do next?
- Enroll in THTR2350 Theatre Production Studies.
- Attend a Theatre Orientation Meeting at the beginning of the semester.
- Participate in at least one theatre production per semester.
- Maintain a 2.8 GPA.
More specific information will be provided in a Grant Confirmation Letter from the Financial Aid office.

Once I have received a Theatre Production Grant, can I lose it?
If you fail to complete the Grant requirements for any semester that grant funds are given, your grant may be revoked.