English Major

An English major encompasses three intertwined areas of study offered by Graceland University's Division of Humanities: Literature, Writing, and Cinema Studies. By orienting coursework toward both the liberal arts tradition and contemporary issues, the major prepares students to understand the cultural context of a complex world, to be innovative, to think critically about practical and theoretical questions, and to articulate their thinking creatively and accurately.

Graduates may move either into further academic pursuits or directly into the job market. They excel in the study of law, graduate programs, teaching and journalism. Graduates find careers in government, education, business, and industry (advertising, public relations, organization communications), journalism and other mass media.

BA Degree - English Major

In addition to the essential education requirements, majors in English must complete a program of 42 s.h.

All survey courses 12 s.h.

  • ENGL2310 British Borders: British Literature to 1800 3 s.h.
  • ENGL2320 Britain, Empire, and Modernity: 19th and 20th Century British and Irish Literature 3 s.h.
  • ENGL2330 Our Bondage and Our Freedom: Literatures of the Americas, 1491-1865 3 s.h.
  • ENGL2340 Legacies of Conquest: American Literature, 1900 to Present 3 s.h.

English electives 9 s.h. (2000 designation or higher; 6 s.h. must be upper-division.)

  • Discourse courses required by essential education cannot be counted towards this requirement.

Creative writing/practicum course 3 s.h. of the following:

Identity and Difference course 3 s.h. of the following:

  • ENGL2350 American Ethnic Literature 3 s.h.
  • ENGL2360 African American Literature 3 s.h.
  • ENGL2600 Gender and Sexuality 3 s.h.
  • ENGL2610 Whiteness and the Working Class 3 s.h.

All of the following: (15 s.h.)

  • ENGL3110 Critical Theory 3 s.h.
  • ENGL3420 Structures of Modern English 3 s.h.
  • ENGL3430 Major Authors 3 s.h.
  • ENGL3480 Cultural Studies 3 s.h.
  • *ENGL4150 Thesis Hours 3 s.h.
    *Thesis hours must be taken over two sequential semesters. A student may register for either 1 or 2 s.h. in a given semester and must do so in arrangement with the English faculty member who will be serving as her or his thesis advisor.

 

English Minor

A minor in English requires 18 or more semester hours in English including ENGL3420 or ENGL3480 and two of the following: ENGL2310, ENGL2320, ENGL2330, ENGL2340.
The following courses are not acceptable for credit in the minor: ENGL1100, ENGL1120, ENGL1410, ENGL2100, ENGL2120, ENGL3100, ENGL3370.

Cinema Studies Minor

A minor in Cinema Studies requires 15 or more semester hours from the following:

Teacher Certification in English

  1. FOR ENGLISH MAJORS WHO WANT A SECONDARY ENDORSEMENT (5-12): In addition to satisfying major requirements, English majors desiring an English/Language Arts secondary endorsement (5-12) in Iowa must complete ENGL1100 Discourse I , ENGL2100 Discourse II, and  the Teacher Education Program (with ENGL3370 Methods of Teaching English as the appropriate methods course).
  2. FOR NON-ENGLISH MAJORS WHO WANT A SECONDARY ENGLISH ENDORSEMENT (5-12): Non-English majors desiring a secondary English/ Language Arts endorsement (5-12) in Iowa must complete the Secondary Education Program (with ENGL3370 Methods of Teaching English as the appropriate methods course), a major in a secondary teaching field and the following courses:

    ENGL1100 Discourse I 3 s.h.
    ENGL2100 Discourse II 3 s.h.
    ENGL3100 Discourse III 3 s.h.
    ENGL2310 British Borders: British Literature to 1800 or
    ENGL2320 Britain, Empire, and Modernity: 19th and 20th Century British and Irish Literature 3 s.h.
    ENGL2330 Our Bondage and Our Freedom: Literatures of the Americas, 1491-1865 3 s.h.
    ENGL3420 Structures of Modern English 3 s.h.
    Approved English Electives 6 s.h.

 

Courses in English

ENGL1100 Discourse I 3 s.h.
"Discourse" refers to the language, images, styles, genres, behaviors and other forms of communication used by specific social and professional groups. This course introduces students to college-level writing and speaking, with a primary focus on composition. In order to lead productive academic, professional, and personal lives, students must learn to communicate their ideas effectively to different audiences in a variety of formats and contexts, as well as to seek and evaluate relevant messages sent by others. Students will produce, deliver, and analyze college-level, written and oral texts; and they will learn how written and oral performances function together in specific discourse communities. Prerequisite for students with ACT English score of 15 and below, or an SAT English score of 480 and below: DEVL1250 or two high school English courses, one of which must be or prominently require composition (not creative writing), with a grade of "C" or better in both. All students must complete Discourse I or transfer in equivalent credit by the end of their third semester at Graceland. Goal 3B, ELO1A Communication

ENGL1120 Honors Discourse I 3 s.h.
"Discourse" refers to the language, images, styles, genres, behaviors and other forms of communication used by specific social and professional groups. This course introduces students to college-level writing and speaking, with a primary focus on composition. In order to lead productive academic, professional, and personal lives, students must learn to communicate their ideas effectively to different audiences in a variety of formats and contexts, as well as to seek and evaluate relevant messages sent by others. Designed to help exceptional students produce, deliver, and analyze college-level, written and oral texts and learn how written and oral performances function together in specific discourse communities. Admission by selection only. Goal 3B, ELO1A Communication

ENGL1410 Modern Rhetoric 3 s.h.
Designed to help students improve their writing skills by combining extensive writing practice with a study of the various forms of written discourse (exposition, narration, argumentation, description). For ACE students only. Goal 3C

ENGL1500 Introduction to Literature 3 s.h.
Introduction to the major genres of literature: fiction, poetry and drama. Designed for students with little or no background in literature. Recommended as preparation for other literature courses. Goal 2B

ENGL2000 Individual Study 1-3 s.h.

ENGL2100 Discourse II 3 s.h.
The second of three sequenced courses focused on integrated written and oral communication skill development emphasizing critical inquiry and research. Students will learn to produce, deliver, and analyze college-level, written and oral texts that are based on sustained academic research. Students will continue to develop their understanding of critical discourse analysis and critical language awareness in the context of a range of discursive forms (written, oral, visual and/or multimedia). Prerequisite: ENGL1100. Goal 3C, ELO1B Communication

ENGL2120 Honors Discourse II 3 s.h.
The second of three sequenced courses focused on integrated written and oral communication skill development emphasizing critical inquiry and research. Students will learn to produce, deliver, and analyze college-level, written and oral texts that are based on sustained academic research, and continue to develop their understanding of critical discourse analysis and critical language awareness in the context of a range of discursive forms (written, oral, visual and/or multimedia). Admission by selection only. Prerequisite: ENGL1120. Goal 3C, ELO1B Communication

ENGL2270 Literature by Women 3 s.h.
This interdisciplinary class offers close, careful readings of a range of literary works by women writers from the English-speaking world. These texts describe their authors’ sometimes problematic, sometimes triumphant relationships to culture and society. The material is arranged chronologically from the middle ages to the present in order to suggest a general historical overview of women’s experiences in western culture. Also this structure should help readers see that there is an important female literary tradition that, for several centuries, has coexisted with, revised, and influenced male literary models. We will explore both the diversity and commonality of women’s experiences, as expressed in issues like culture, race, class, sexual orientation, education, geography, and religion. Goal 2B

ENGL2310 British Borders: British Literature to 1800 3 s.h.
Survey of significant works originating from the British Isles through the eighteenth century, with an emphasis on poetry and drama. Examines the fluctuating concept of “Britishness” in literature in relation to the national borders of England, Wales, Scotland, and Ireland as they were shaped throughout this period. Goal 2B, ELO5 Humanities - World Citizenship

ENGL2320 Britain, Empire, and Modernity: 19th and 20th Century British and Irish Literature 3 s.h.
Survey of significant works by “British” and Irish writers from the beginning of the nineteenth century through the end of the twentieth century. Emphasizes literary visions of peace and conflict amidst major political and social upheavals. Goal 2B, ELO5 Humanities - Peace

ENGL2330 Our Bondage and Our Freedom: Literatures of the Americas, 1491-1865 3 s.h.
Survey of writers from North and South America stretching from the advent of European colonization in the Western Hemisphere to the conclusion of the U.S. Civil War. The course will pay special attention to the legacies of colonialism and slavery, and the ways that literature and language, as oral storytelling and print culture, both underwrote systems of enslavement and created social movements for freedom and equality. Goal 2B, ELO5 Humanities - Equality

ENGL2340 Legacies of Conquest: American Literature, 1900 to Present 3 s.h.
Survey of U.S. Literature in the 20th and 21st centuries. Special attention given to the emergence of the U.S. as a dominant world power, the impact of global migration to the United States, and the influence of those two socio-historical transformations on U.S. Literature. Goal 2B, ELO5 Humanities - World Citizenship

++ENGL2350 American Ethnic Literature 3 s.h.
A survey of multi-ethnic U.S. literature, including Latino/a literature, Asian American literature, Native American literature, and American Jewish literature. As a complement to literary texts, students will also examine a range of introductory theoretical texts in the interdisciplinary field of ethnic studies. Goal 2B, ELO5 Humanities - Equality

++ENGL2360 African American Literature 3 s.h.
A survey of African American literature from the eighteenth century to the present. An array of discursive modes, including songs, folklore, speeches, poetry, fiction and drama, will be analyzed across various African-American artistic and social movements, from sorrow songs, abolitionist tracts, and the Harlem Renaissance to civil rights speeches, the Black Arts avant-garde, and spoken word performance. As a complement to literary texts, students will also examine a range of introductory theoretical texts in the interdisciplinary field of African-American studies. Goal 2B, ELO5 Humanities - Equality

+ENGL2370 World Literature 3 s.h.
Examines literary works by authors from a broad range of artistic and cultural traditions, emphasizing literature in translation. Designed to offer students an introduction to literature as a point of access into global communities. Goal 2B, ELO5 Humanities - World Citizenship

+ ENGL2410 Creative Writing: Poetry 3 s.h.
Study of poetry writing through the lens of sustainability. Investigates the maintenance of various systems that meet human needs (e.g. emotional, physical, social, environmental) through extensive poetry writing and class discussion. Emphasis on poetry as a means of self-discovery as well as an art form. Goal 2B, ELO5 Humanities - Sustainability

+ ENGL2420 Creative Writing: Fiction 3 s.h.
Study of fiction writing through the lens of sustainability. Investigates the maintenance of various systems that meet human needs (e.g. emotional, physical, social, environmental) through extensive fiction writing and class discussion. Emphasis on fiction as a means of self-discovery as well as an art form. Goal 2B, ELO5 Humanities - Sustainability

+ ENGL2500 Introduction to Mass Media (Also COMM2500) 3 s.h.
An examination of the various landmark theories, such as rhetorical, Marxist, and feminist to analyze popular culture, with an emphasis on the importance of communication in the production and consumption of culture. Students will study the development of culture by applying different theories or 'lenses' to cultural artifacts including music, movies, advertisements, clothing, etc.

ENGL2510 Introduction to Film 3 s.h.
Study of cinema as an artistic endeavor, form of rhetoric, cultural mirror, and purveyor of ideology. Introduces the fundamentals of the discipline, to include vocabulary, concepts of film production, film reception, film analysis, film interpretation, and film criticism. Exploration of the artistic, commercial, entertainment, and ideological relationships between cinema and American culture, along with practice in the film literacy skills needed to qualitatively assess and communicate cinema’s artistic and cultural contributions. Goal 2B, ELO5 Humanities - Innovation

ENGL2530 Film Topics 3 s.h.
An introduction to contemporary and historical film topics as they relate to film form and cultural practice. Topics will vary, but may include Politics in Cinema; Resisting Hollywood; Race, Class and Gender in Film; International Film; Representing Nature. May be repeated for credit when topic changes. Goal 2B.

+ENGL2540 Global Eco-Cinema 3 s.h.
A transnational survey of films that deal with environmental issues and, more broadly, with human relationships to the nonhuman world. An examination of the impact of urbanization on rural communities, the mysterious allure of wild and uncultivated landscapes, the threat of climate change to daily life around the world, and the cinematic representation of environmental apocalypse. Explores different genres and styles, including neo-realism, eco-horror, anime, and avant-garde cinema. Goal 2B, ELO5 Humanities - Sustainability

++ENGL2600 Gender and Sexuality 3 s.h.
An exploration of issues of gender and sexuality in literature, with a focus on fiction, drama, and poetry by women and LGBT+ writers. As a complement to literary texts, students will also examine a range of introductory theoretical texts in the interdisciplinary field of gender and sexuality studies. Goal 2B, ELO5 Humanities - Equality

++ENGL2610 Whiteness and the Working Class 3 s.h.
An exploration of the racial category of whiteness and its historical relationship to social class and power in the United States. Representations of the white working class in literature, music, film, and television will be analyzed alongside cultural histories of multiracial, antiracist labor movements in the United States. As a complement to cultural texts, students will also examine a range of introductory theoretical texts in the multidisciplinary fields of Critical Whiteness Studies and working class studies. Goal 2B, ELO5 Humanities - Equality

ENGL2900 Topics in English 3 s.h.
Special studies in English designed primarily for the non-English major. Content may vary and will be announced at time of offering. When content changes, course may be repeated for credit.

ENGL3000 Individual Study 1-3 s.h.

ENGL3100 Discourse III 3 s.h.
Teaches students to put the knowledge and skills learned in Discourse I and II into sustained, practical use by preparing them for substantial, interdisciplinary research projects. In this course, students will explore issues of civic, public, or community concern using rhetorical analysis, engage in deliberation over those issues, and ultimately propose solutions based on well-developed arguments. Students are expected to use strategies of critical discourse analysis and production to target the appropriate audience/recipients and to develop innovative and rhetorically effective texts (written, oral, visual and/or multimedia). Prerequisites: Discourse II and Junior standing. Goal 3D, ELO1C Communication

+ ENGL3110 Critical Theory 3 s.h.
Advanced study of literary, cultural, and moving image theory, and the application to written and filmic texts.

ENGL3150 Film, Theatre, and the American Dream 3 s.h.
Explores a fundamental component of American mythology referred to as "The American Dream." Examines some of the ways in which the American Dream has been defined, promulgated, and evaluated in films and plays. Implications of gender, ethnicity, income, geography, and historical period on perceptions of the American Dream also will be investigated. Goal 2B

+ENGL3240 Poetry and Social Justice 3 s.h.
An investigation of the role of poetry as a vehicle for social change. With a focus on the poetry of emancipatory social movements, this global survey course includes a range of modern poets who merged the personal with the political, including William Blake, Walt Whitman, Muriel Rukeyser, Pablo Neruda, Amiri Baraka, Adrienne Rich, June Jordan, Dennis Brutus, and Mahmoud Darwish. Students examine how poetry and poetic form function as a means of engaging ethical and social concerns, and eliciting emotions in readers-from rage and defiance to observation and understanding-that might serve to promote social justice. Goal 2B, ELO5 Humanities - Peace

ENGL3300 Creative Writing Experiments 3 s.h.
An investigation of experimental writing and the ways it disrupts preconceived notions of genre. Students will write individually and collaboratively, composing short stories, poems, nonfiction pieces, and comics that reimagine the uses and possibilities of language. Goal 2B, ELO5 Humanities - Innovation

+ ENGL3350 Shakespeare (Also THTR3350) 3 s.h.
Study of a selection of plays and poems likely authored or co-authored by Shakespeare, emphasizing the plays as historical performance texts. Encourages students to locate Shakespeare’s works within Renaissance-era notions of harmony and discord, and war and peace. Goal 2B, ELO5 Humanities - Peace

+ ENGL3370 The Methods of Teaching English 3 s.h.
Presents an overview of the secondary school curriculum in English and methods of teaching English including language, composition, and literature. Special emphasis on a review of teaching grammar and the development of a unit lesson plan. Required of prospective English teachers. Prerequisites:  admittance into Teacher Education, unless part of an approved Liberal Studies Program.

+ ENGL3420 Structures in Modern English 3 s.h.
An introduction to grammatical structures of the English language. Emphasizes the history and development of English in different cultural communities as a means to understand, rather than prescribe, how English-speakers use language. Encourages active participation in, rather than passive observance of, language’s evolutionary processes and social functions. ELO5 Humanities - Innovation

+ ENGL3430 Major Authors 3 s.h.
An intensive study of the work of multiple authors, with attention given to their literary, historical, and social milieu. May be repeated for credit when subject changes. Goal 2B

+ ENGL3480 Cultural Studies 3 s.h.
Explores cultural systems of meaning and attendant issues of power, particularly in terms of class, gender, nation, race, nature, and sexuality. Emphasis on commercial and media culture. ELO5 Humanities - Equality

ENGL3550 Film Studies 3 s.h.
A detailed study of significant film practices and themes. Themes will focus on film genres, directors, and historical trends. Topics will vary, but may include, Documentary Film; Independent Film; Queer Cinema; Film Theory; Experimental Film; Kubrick; Hitchcock. May be repeated for credit when topic changes. Prerequisite: ENGL2510 or Instructor Consent. Goal 2B

+ ENGL3530 Digital Filmmaking 3 s.h.
A hands-on introduction to digital film production and editing. Introduces the technical knowledge need to investigate the creative possibilities of composition, light, motion, color and sound in shooting digital film. Examines the fundamentals of nonlinear editing, including continuity development, logging clips, audio tracks, and transitions. Additional fee required. Prerequisites: ENGL2510 or instructor consent. Goal 2B

ENGL3560 Race, Space, and Place in American Cinema 3 s.h.
An investigation of intersecting representations of race, space, and place in postwar American Cinema and the different ways that films reproduce dominant cultural notions of “racialized space” that contribute to ongoing problems such as segregation, economic inequality, and police brutality. Emphasis on how films can challenge systems of spatialized racism and other forms of oppression and help in the struggles for racial and environmental justice. Additional emphasis on formal qualities of films, such as editing and cinematography, as ways to develop and enrich interpretations of what we see on screen. Goal 2B, ELO5 Humanities - Equality

ENGL3570 Documentary Film 3 s.h.
Explores the history, economics, and formal qualities of the “documentary tradition” in filmmaking, with a special focus on documentary films that engage issues of sustainability, broadly defined (environmental, social, and economic). Goal 2B, ELO5 Humanities - Sustainability

ENGL3900 Topics in English 1-3 s.h.
Study of selected topics of interest in English, to be announced prior to the semester when the course is offered. May be repeated for credit as topics change.

ENGL4000 Individual Study 1-3 s.h.

ENGL4150 Thesis Hours 1-2 s.h.
Planning, preparing, and presenting a senior project in the student's area of concentration.  Repeatable for credit up to 3 semester hours.

ENGL4300 Internship in English 1-3 s.h.
Off-campus practical experience in a communication related professional setting. Offers an opportunity for application of communication skills and knowledge in monitored individual learning setting related to student’s academic and career interests. Pass/Fail only. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Repeatable to a maximum of six hours.

ENGL4400 Practicum in Information Services (Also COMM4400) 1-3 s.h.
On-campus practical experience in college relations office, admissions office, media center or alumni relations office. Offers an opportunity for study in a monitored individual learning setting. Pass/Fail only. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor and permission of the appropriate college official. Repeatable to a maximum of six hours.

THTR3140 Playwriting 3 s.h.
Study and application of playwriting techniques and theory. In addition to a number of creative writing exercises, students will write a one-act by the conclusion of the course. Goal 2A.

+ Denotes an alternate year course.