Transfer Credit for Master of Education Programs

Management in the Quality Classroom or Differentiated Instruction

Candidates may transfer six hours of Quality Educational Programs course work into the program. Two of the following courses may be transferred into the Master of Education with an Emphasis in Management in the Quality Classroom or Differentiated Instruction. Please check with your Program Consultant (800-833-0524 Ext. 4516) regarding which two courses are appropriate transfer classes for your emphasis. Requirements for Transferring Coursework

Students wishing to transfer graduate credit must submit the following items with the Admission documents:

  • Official transcript
  • $100 non-refundable processing fee for each course
  • Course reflection paper (guidelines for content will be provided by Program Consultant)

Please note - transfer credit documentation must be received at the time of admission

Upon acceptance into the program, the paper will be submitted for review by a member of the Gleazer School of Education faculty. If the Course Reflection receives a passing score, the student will be notified by the Program Consultant of the course transfer acceptance. If it is not accepted, the candidate will have one opportunity to rewrite and resubmit the course reflection. If a paper does not meet the identified criteria after a second submission, the GSOE faculty member will contact the Program Consultant at which time the student will be notified that the identified course will be added to his/her program of study.

Once the transfer credit has been awarded, the Program Consultant will document the fulfillment of the course with the Registrar's office. Students who transfer video grades of C will be informed by the Program Consultant that this grade may impact their status in the program.

Possible Courses to Transfer

Introduction to Choice Theory: Teaching Students Responsible Behavior
A three semester hour graduate course designed to give teachers the theory and skills to teach students how to take responsibility for their own behavior in school. Based on the work of Dr. William Glasser, this course leads participants through a series of learning activities designed to instruct them how to teach their students the concepts of Control Theory and to plan and implement a program of Responsibility Training in their classrooms.

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Enhancing Instruction: Teaching in the Quality Classroom
A three semester hour graduate course designed to give teachers the theory and skills to create lesson plans that meet the basic psychological needs of students, gain their cooperation in the learning process, and promote quality work. Based on the work of Dr. William Glasser, this course leads participants through a series of learning activities designed to instruct them in the concepts of Control Theory and Quality Schools and how these concepts can be combined in a program of instruction and behavior management that results in quality student work.

Motivation and Learning: Cooperation and the Quality Classroom
A three semester hour graduate course designed to give teachers the theory and skills to create lesson plans that meet the basic psychological needs of students and gain their cooperation in the learning process. Based on the works of Drs. William Glasser, David Johnson and Roger Johnson, this course leads participants through a series of learning activities designed to instruct them in the concepts of Control Theory and Cooperative Leaning and how these concepts can be combined in a program of instruction and behavior management.

Responsibility, Respect, and Relationships: Creating Emotionally Safe Classrooms
A three semester hour graduate course designed to provide teachers the knowledge and skills to deal with students' apprehensions and fears and at the same time create an emotionally safe classroom atmosphere that promotes learning. Topics covered include teaching to various learning styles and preferences, setting attainable goals for improving student achievement, and helping students in crisis situations.

Classroom Management: Dealing with Discipline Problem
A three semester hour graduate course designed to provide teachers the knowledge and skills to apply previously learned choice theory concepts to commonly occurring classroom discipline problems. As a course outcome, participants will develop a personalized plan designed not only to solve discipline problems but also to help students take responsibility for their own behavior.

Gaining Parental Support: Building Home-School Relationships
A three semester hour graduate course designed to help teachers acquire the theory and skills to improve communication with parents, hold more effective parent conferences, and implement strategies that build a collaborative partnership between school and home. The course provides theoretical foundations and implementation designs that prepare teachers to work more effectively with parents to improve student achievement.

Making Learning Meaningful: Every Student Can Succeed                    
A three semester hour graduate course designed to help teachers focus on the practical application of Dr. William Glasser's theories regarding competency-based education, authentic assessment, and real-world teaching strategies that help to ensure the success of every student.  Teachers develop and apply instructional strategies that foster student self-management, cooperative learning, problem solving and the production of quality school work. 

Reality Therapy Intensive Week Workshop
The four day workshop includes a discussion of the concepts behind Reality Therapy, Choice Theory, the Counseling Environment, Procedures, and special applications to schools, coaching employees, and therapy-counseling.  Participants will learn no-nonsense, practical skills immediately applicable on the job - including clarification of wants, determining behavioral direction, seven forms of evaluation, characteristics of plans (the WDEP system of Reality Therapy).

Introduction to Differentiation: Applying Learner-Centered Instruction
This course provides an introduction to the philosophy of differentiation. This course will examine ways that classrooms can effectively support differentiating instruction and assessment to address the complex challenges of meeting the diverse learning needs of all students. Also covered are such issues as fairness and grading, developing study and academic skills, and challenging all students at appropriate levels.

Differentiated Instructional Strategies
This course is designed to give participants the knowledge and skills to implement differentiated instruction successfully in their own classrooms. Topics include strategies for meeting the needs of an increasingly diverse student population within the context of today's challenging standards-based curriculum. Real-life video demonstrations will illustrate how to adapt curriculum content, processes, and products to match students' readiness, interests, and learning profiles.

Differentiated Assessment Strategies
This course is designed to teach participants how to gather information through formal and informal assessment that will help them plan instruction more effectively. This course will teach participants how to best utilize tests, surveys, checklists, and guidelines to accurately asses their students' progress and plan for their continued success. Participants will also learn how to use ongoing assessment and assessment during learning to improve the effectiveness of their lessons.

Teaching in the Inclusive Classroom
This course is designed to present participants with practical strategies to maximize learning for all students, including those with special needs. Participants will learn inclusive teaching techniques first hand with video visits to classrooms where teachers are successfully educating both general and special education students. Course learning activities will teach you how to design and implement curriculum modifications and activity adaptations based on the strengths and needs of students.